Flintlock

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Flintlock

 

a pistol, handgun, hand firearm (smooth or rifled bore) with a flint lock, in which the charge was ignited by sparks produced by the flint hitting the steel plate.

Flintlocks were used by Russian and foreign armies from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The flintlocks of the 17th to 19th centuries adopted by the Russian forces ranged in caliber from 17.5 to 21.5 mm; they weighed 4.0 to 5.6 kg; and they had a 140 to 800 m range of fire, depending on the type of weapon (smooth or rifled bore). The firing rate of smoothbore flintlocks was one shot a minute and that of rifled-bore weapons was one shot in five minutes. In the mid-19th century flintlocks were replaced by rifles in all armies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among their offerings is the Mortimer flintlock, a rifle that represents the high-water mark of flintlock technology.
The pistol features a long, graceful 12-1/2" 50-caliber swamped barrel by Ed Rayl and a finely-made petite Chambers flintlock.
After several frustrating misses, muzzleloader Garrett MacAdams left his black powder at home and shot two deer with his shotgun, but he's back in the woods today with his flintlock for what he considers his ultimate challenge.
Over the centuries many designs have been experimented with which to achieve this aim, from matchlock mechanisms, flintlock and percussion weapons.
The War of 1812 is well-represented by an assortment of muskets and flintlock pistols manufactured at the Harpers Ferry Armory.
Like Minutemen equipped with flashlights instead of flintlocks, Smith's volunteers must be ready for action at short notice.
To prepare for The Patriot, the actors went to 18th century boot camp, where they learned to load and fire flintlocks as though it were second nature and how to handle sabres.
The spark that finally set off the revolution in New England was the attempt by the British to disarm the colonists of their flintlocks, the source of both game and self-protection.
Displays follow a timeline, beginning with 15th-century matchlocks, then showing flintlocks, percussion rifles and revolvers, and cartridge and gas-operated arms.
A good number of earlier flintlocks (pistols, carbines and muskets) were similarly updated by the French, an economical practice that was followed by most major militaries of the world around the mid part of the 19th century.
How about The State, or the 051, Rotters, McMillan's, Paradox, The Continental, Casablanca, Flintlocks or the Coconut Grove?