Florentine


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Florentine

a type of domestic fancy pigeon somewhat resembling the Modena
References in periodicals archive ?
Seeking to derail the almost exclusive attention on the ruling Medici family in studies on Florence from 1600 to 1660, Goudriaan shows how educated members of the Florentine patriciate contributed substantially to the cultural success of the Medici court, and how their networks were responsible for many cultural innovations in Florentine society.
A Great and Wretched City: Promise and Failure in Machiavelli's Florentine Political Thought.
A Great & Wretched City: Promise and Failure in Machiavelli's Florentine Political Thought, by Mark Jurdjevic.
Mark Jurdjevic, A Great and Wretched City: Promise and Failure in Machiavelli's Florentine Political Thought, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA, 2014; 312 pp.
Milner of the University of Manchester found it while researching Florentine town criers in the 15th to early 16th centuries.
In florentine Fleximold[R], distribute 1 tablespoon of mixture into each cavity.
Rural inhabitants (contadini) in fact shared much with Florentine citizens (cittadini): professions, economies, networks and even notions of governance.
The agency deployed in writing such epistles, using the tools and parameters of Florentine culture to distinguish oneself, McLean argues fostered the evolution of the modern sense of self: "we can see the beginning traces of ourselves in the techniques the letter writers employed to obtain advancement and recognition through their cultural agency in the domain of patronage seeking" (xiii).
Unger's treatment is generously paced; it adopts a narrative approach while taking time to discuss Lorenzo's Medici background and the Florentine and Italian contexts.
He notes evidence of the Florentine government's recorded approvals of codes and revisions negotiated by towns large and small pertaining to rights and privileges that demonstrate an interest by the subject populations in participating in the shared "honor" of Florentine citizenship and, in turn, Florence's recognition of local prerogatives and legal traditions.
Education and society in Florentine Tuscany; teachers, pupils and schools, c.
Domenico Michelino's painting of Dante and his Comedy (1465), now located on the north wall of the Florentine cathedral, juxtaposes the realms of the afterlife depicted in the poem--hell, purgatory, heaven--with the world of Michelino's contemporary Florence.