Foresight


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

foresight

[′fȯr‚sīt]
(engineering)
A sight or bearing on a new survey point, taken in a forward direction and made in order to determine its elevation.
A sight on a previously established survey point, taken in order to close a circuit.
A reading taken on a level rod to determine the elevation of the point on which the rod rests when read. Also known as minus sight.

Foresight

(graphics, tool)
A software product from Nu Thena providing graphical modelling tools for high level system design and simulation.
References in classic literature ?
But how about the foresight and the moral retrogression?
But since we see that he has broken the elastic and has not troubled to replace it, it is obvious that he has less foresight now than formerly, which is a distinct proof of a weakening nature.
Soon, however, prudence and foresight drew the young couple from their Eden; it was necessary to work to live.
It's of no use to have foresight when you are dealing with an idiot: he is not to be calculated upon.
de Balzac, whose foresight is so remarkably at home in the future.
The old lady nodded the satisfaction which this proof of the surly man's foresight imparted to her feelings; and the surly man giving a smart lash to the chubby horse, they all repaired to Mr.
So far it was all as she had foreseen; but on entering the house she beheld what no foresight had taught her to expect.
This meeting with William and Dora was fortunate from the point of view of my studies; for that very night, as I dined with them en pension, I found that providence, with his usual foresight, had placed me next to a very charming American girl of the type that I was particularly wishful to study.
This writer went through all the usual topics of European moralists, showing "how diminutive, contemptible, and helpless an animal was man in his own nature; how unable to defend himself from inclemencies of the air, or the fury of wild beasts: how much he was excelled by one creature in strength, by another in speed, by a third in foresight, by a fourth in industry.
And let no one fancy that the author was at all astray when he compared the friendship of these animals to that of men; for men have received many lessons from beasts, and learned many important things, as, for example, the clyster from the stork, vomit and gratitude from the dog, watchfulness from the crane, foresight from the ant, modesty from the elephant, and loyalty from the horse.
Does it not argue a superintending Providence that, while viewless and unexpected events thrust themselves continually athwart our path, there should still be regularity enough in mortal life to render foresight even partially available?
The part which provoked her most, was that in all this waste of foresight and caution, she should have lost the right moment for seeing whether he saw them.