Fornacalia


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Fornacalia

Around February 17
The Fornacalia, or Feast of Ovens, was observed no later than February 17, which was also the day of the Quirinalia festival honoring the ancient Roman god Quirinus. The Fornacalia was designed to benefit the ovens ( fornices ) that parched grain and was held to placate the goddess Fornix, who presided over them. It lasted a week, during which each household made an offering of far, flour of the oldest kind of Italian wheat, roasted in the oven and then crushed in an ancient mill and served in the form of cakes. The rituals involved in the Fornacalia were observed primarily by the curiae, or tribal divisions of Rome, and it was celebrated in February on different days—one day for the state and one for each of the curiae. According to Ovid, those who were uncertain which curia they belonged to ended up observing this festival on February 17 instead of on the proper day. At this time a general offering of cakes was made by the whole community.
SOURCES:
FestRom-1981, p. 73
FestSaintDays-1915, p. 43
NewCentClassHandbk-1962, p. 641
OxClassDict-1970, p. 444
OxYear-1999, p. 82
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References in periodicals archive ?
She believes the Saint's day just replaced the pagan festival of Fornacalia.
Like many pagan festivals, it had a Christian veneer painted on top, but underneath is still the old mating festival of Fornacalia.