Fort Pillow

Fort Pillow,

fortification on the Mississippi River, N of Memphis, Tenn.; built by Confederate Gen. Gideon Pillow in 1862. Evacuated by the Confederates after the fall of Island No. 10Island No. 10,
former island in the Mississippi River, between NW Tenn. and SE Mo.; site of an important western campaign of the Civil War. With the advance of Union Gen. U. S. Grant up the Tennessee River, all Confederate positions, except New Madrid and Island No.
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 to the north, the fort was occupied by Union troops on June 6, 1862. Confederate Gen. Nathan Forrest stormed and captured Fort Pillow on Apr. 12, 1864, killing many African-American defenders. Often called the Fort Pillow Massacre, it became one of the greatest atrocity stories of the Civil War. Charged with ruthless killing, Forrest argued that the soldiers had been killed trying to escape; however, racial animosity on the part of his troops was undoubtedly a factor.

Pillow, Fort:

see Fort PillowFort Pillow,
fortification on the Mississippi River, N of Memphis, Tenn.; built by Confederate Gen. Gideon Pillow in 1862. Evacuated by the Confederates after the fall of Island No. 10 to the north, the fort was occupied by Union troops on June 6, 1862. Confederate Gen.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
When they weren't talking about his slaves or his slave trading, they talked about his heroism in battle, though they didn't talk about the Battle of Fort Pillow, when he had ordered the massacre of hundreds of American troops attempting to surrender, most of them former slaves.
But Forrest himself famously said "War is killing," and we can't talk about him and killing in the same breath, without discussing what history remembers as the Fort Pillow Massacre.
The River was Dyed with Blood: Nathan Bedford Forrest & Fort Pillow.
There was not a pit at Fort Pillow, caused by a Union explosion, where black troops were trapped and murdered by the South.
Nathan Bedford Forrest took Union-held Fort Pillow in Tennessee; almost half of the Union garrison was made up of black soldiers, many of whom were slain by the Confederates.
The Fort Pillow massacre: North, South, and the Status of African-Americans in the Civil War Era
Fort Pillow, a Civil War Massacre, and Public Memory, by John Cimprich.
The biographers cover his childhood, marriage, life as a businessman who became a self-made millionaire in Memphis, Tennessee, his work as a civic leader, and offers explanation for the alleged massacre at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, his dramatic call for full citizenship for Black Southerners, and his post-civil war involvement with the infamous Ku Klux Klan.
Another common theme among the authors is the Fort Pillow Massacre of 1864.
Some of these troops won fame on the battlefield, and some were shamefully massacred when captured, as at Fort Pillow.
Enraged Confederate soldiers shot dead helpless black men, refusing them the right to become prisoners, at Olustee, Florida; Poison Springs, Arkansas; Fort Pillow, Tennessee; Plymouth, North Carolina; Petersburg, Virginia; and Saltville, Virginia.
General Forrest's attack on Fort Pillow marked the launching of the method by which the South would keep the "niggers" in their "place" and maintain white supremacy.

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