Fortran 90


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Related to Fortran 90: Fortran 77

Fortran 90

(Previously "Fortran 8x" and "Fortran Extended") An extensive enlargement of Fortran 77. Fortran 90 has derived types, assumed shape arrays, array sections, functions returning arrays, case statement, module subprograms and internal subprograms, optional and keyword subprogram arguments, recursion, and dynamic allocation. It is defined in ISO 1539:1991, soon to be adopted by ANSI.

["Fortran 90 Explained", M. Metcalf et al, Oxford University Press 1990].
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fortran 90 language allows a convenient packing of the necessary data structures inside a single derived data type as follows:
The Fortran 90 array operations and intrinsic functions enabled us to write the code in a very compact form that closely corresponds to the mathematical description of the underlying algorithm.
If the type information provided by the sample file differs from the file used during run-time, the generated Fortran 90 program would probably be incorrect.
Many of the new features of Fortran 90 can support object-oriented programming methodology.
Fortran 90 offers "greater safety, expressive power and convenience" than its predecessor, says John K.
This mutually beneficial project brings the Intel Fortran 90 compiler to a unique level of performance, allowing the use of adjoint-based optimization methods across a wide range of industry sectors.
Users who change over to Fortran 90 will presumably wish to make use of the new features, otherwise they will have no motivation to make the change.
High Performance Fortran is an extension of Fortran 90.
Single-instruction, multiple-data (SIMD) machines such as the Thinking Machines CM-2 are programmed using parallel array constructs found in Fortran 90 [3].
The kit contains the Fortran 90 source code needed for the new heat balance load calculation procedures introduced in the 2001 ASHRAE Handbook, Fundamentals.
C ++ and Fortran 90 both have some built-in support for OOP although both are extensions of procedural languages.