Fort

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fort

[fȯrt]
(ordnance)
Permanent post as opposed to a camp, which is a temporary installation.
Land area within which harbor defense units are located.

Fort

A fortified place or position stationed with troops; a bastion, fortification. The first buildings erected in towns had protective walls.

Fort

 

a large fortified structure, either open (field) or enclosed (permanent).

Forts were first constructed in the 18th century, initially as separate fortifications outside a fortress wall (seeFORTRESS) and later, from the 18th to early 20th centuries, as part of a fortress or a fortified field position. Open forts assumed a variety of forms; they occupied an area of 4–5 hectares and were adapted to all-around defense. One or two earthen banks were erected around the perimeter, which measured about 1,000 m; the banks were protected by ditches and other obstacles, and 20–50 artillery pieces were placed behind the banks. The inside of the wall was equipped as a fire position. For purposes of defense, a garrison of two to four rifle companies was assigned to a fort and stationed in shelters, in addition to artillery crews.

Permanent forts were built of stone, concrete, armor, or other material. Initially, in the 18th century, they took the form of multilevel stone towers, armed with many guns. In the 19th century, forts were designed according to the bastion system; French forts had four or five bastions, each with 40–50 artillery pieces. Later, the caponier system was developed; in Germany, for example, forts were constructed with 20–30 artillery pieces, two flanking caponiers, and one central redoubt caponier.

As new types of fortifications came into use after World War I, such as defensive complexes and strongpoints, the fort lost its importance as an individual entity and henceforth was used only as part of a fortified area.

What does it mean when you dream about a fort?

Forts represent safety and protection. Perhaps the dreamer needs a fortress against worldly invasion, or perhaps the dreamer is deliberately erecting barriers against life.

fort

A defensive work, exclusively military in nature, that is strengthened for protection against enemy attack and commonly incorporates a series of bastions (i.e., projections from the outer wall of the fort) to defend the adjacent perimeter; usually occupied by troops. See bastion, battlement, breastwork, casemate, embrasure, loophole, rampart.
References in classic literature ?
In this time the enemy began to undermine our fort, which was situated sixty yards from Kentucke river.
In a field, near Lexington, an Indian shot a man, and running to scalp him, was himself shot from the fort, and fell dead upon his enemy.
de Treville, in the same tone, "that a party of PROCUREURS, commissaries, and men of the police--very estimable people, but very inveterate, as it appears, against the uniform--have taken upon themselves to arrest in a house, to lead away through the open street, and throw into the Fort l'Eveque, all upon an order which they have refused to show me, one of my, or rather your Musketeers, sire, of irreproachable conduct, of an almost illustrious reputation, and whom your Majesty knows favorably, Monsieur Athos.
But let us be quick--the king may change his mind in an hour; and at all events it is more difficult to replace a man in the Fort l'Eveque or the Bastille who has got out, than to keep a prisoner there who is in.
It is one object of our task, however, to present scenes of the rough life of the wilderness, and we are tempted to fix these few memorials of a transient state of things fast passing into oblivion; for the feudal state of Fort William is at an end, its council chamber is silent and deserted; its banquet hall no longer echoes to the burst of loyalty, or the "auld world" ditty; the lords of the lakes and forests have passed away; and the hospitable magnates of Montreal where are they?
the brave coloured officer who was the colour-bearer at Fort Wagner and held the American flag.
Some hideous member of the ape-man tribe had entered the fort and carried her off.
It was at Fort Yukon that White Fang saw his first white men.
Through the heavy Caspakian air, beneath the swollen sun, the five men marched northwest from Fort Dinosaur, now waist-deep in lush, jungle grasses starred with myriad gorgeous blooms, now across open meadow-land and parklike expanses and again plunging into dense forests of eucalyptus and acacia and giant arboreous ferns with feathered fronds waving gently a hundred feet above their heads.
The young men are much afraid of the bad water at Cambell Fort.
The river washes along the front of the old fort, and so protects it, but on the sides and behind there are many doors, and these had to be guarded, of course, in the old quarter as well as in that which was actually held by our troops.
In truth, that day at Fort Yukon, the spirit thermometer registered seventy-five degrees below zero, which, since freezing- point is thirty-two above, was equivalent to one hundred and seven degrees of frost.