fowler flap

fowler flap

fowler flap
Fowler flap.
A type of trailing edge flap that moves out of the wings on tracks. These flaps increase the wing area, the chord, and the camber and help in boundarylayer control. They provide maximum additional lift. Fowler flaps are commonly used but have a complicated mechanism.
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The Fowler flap common to Cessna singles actually moves aft and downward at the same time, effectively increasing the wing's chord and physically increasing lifting area.
Kudva described the new segmented multiflap structure as "like a two-segment Fowler flap.
He noted that because Cessna used Fowler flaps that moved aft and down during extension, that there had been concern about an increase in stall speed with flap gap seals.
To achieve the balance of high-speed, high-altitude cruise and low-speed approach and landing performance, the wing will have modest sweep, inboard and outboard Fowler flaps and large ground spoilers.
But high-wing airplanes with huge Fowler flaps can float way more than we want when those flaps are fully deployed, reducing sink momentarily and adding to any tendency to float in ground effect if too fast.
A push-rod operated lifting canard--stabilizer and elevator--was installed just below the midpoint of the cowling, full-span flaps replaced the ailerons and Fowler flaps and a complex spoiler system referred to as "Wren's teeth" was created for roll control.
At the other end of the speed spectrum, the D model stalls at a remarkably low 47 knots thanks to the Fowler flaps, with the earlier models a few knots higher.
The combination of the long span, Fowler flaps with vortex generators and gurney strips on the trailing edge produce a full-flap stall speed of 50 knots indicated or 61 KCAS.