Habitat fragmentation

(redirected from Fragmented habitat)

Habitat fragmentation

Habitat disruption where natural habitat is broken into small, relatively isolated sections.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have killed thousands of species and fragmented habitat.
Spatial arrangement of trap locations (filled circles) within forested woodlot (dark gray), wooded fencerow (dark gray, extending into field) and row-crop (light gray) habitats along fragmented habitat edges sampled in west-central Indiana, 2014-2015.
Climate change, isolation, and increasingly fragmented habitat continue to threaten the long-term survival of Yellowstone's grizzly bears.
Projects range from a detailed study of the genetics of jaguars in the northernmost part of their range, to determining locations for road crossing structures to reconnect fragmented habitat, to installing wildlife cameras in 16 mountain ranges throughout southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico as part of a jaguar survey and monitoring project.
Others have been damaged by strip mining or invasive species or have become fragmented habitat through which wildlife can't move freely.
That's being done in parts of Europe, where underpasses and fencing can help connect fragmented habitat and channel wildlife out of harm's way.
The population living in northeastern Poland is on the western-most limit of the natural range of the species and it occupies highly fragmented habitat.
Loggers are cutting down the forests where the highland mangabey was found near Mount Rungwe, and Davenport calls for immediate protection of the monkey's already fragmented habitat.
To pursue the network concept and practical actions with greater emphasis, the County Council undertook a preliminary investigation of the fragmented habitat resource between 1996 and 1999.
Overall habitat quality within a watershed is increased when patches of fragmented habitat are connected by corridors, They provide wildlife access to a diversity of habitat resources, typically dispersed across the landscape.
The Moose and Spruce Creek corridors are high-traffic areas for wolves and bears, species with migrating patterns that are particularly sensitive to fragmented habitat and human disturbance.