frame dragging

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frame dragging

[′frām ‚drag·iŋ]
References in periodicals archive ?
As the black hole spins, the disk's innermost material experiences a frame-dragging effect that's about 100 trillion times as strong as the effect experienced by the Earth-orbiting gyroscopes, Ingram reported.
3%, and that a frame-dragging effect was also seen and matches Einstein to within 19%.
The satellite carried four advanced gyroscopes to measure geodetic effect, the warping of space and time around a gravitational body, and frame-dragging, or how much a spinning object pulls space and time with it when it turns.
Gravity Probe B (GP-B), launched in 2004, used four ultra-precise gyroscopes to measure the hypothesized geodetic effect, the warping of space and time around a gravitational body, and frame-dragging, the amount a spinning object pulls space and time with it as it rotates.
of Zacatecas, Mexico) assembles papers on Process Physics and quantum foam, Carmeli's cosmology, a pseudo-Kaluza-Klein scheme for the geometrical description of the physical world, the Big Bang, frame-dragging and gravitational wave detection, Alternative Relativistic Mechanics, equations of geodesic deviation and the inverse scattering transform, the evolution of the principle of relativity, and other topics, written by researchers in physics and mathematics from Australia, Europe, Mexico, and China.
These involve the so-called gravito-electromagnetic effects (GEM) such as frame-dragging, or Coriolis effect, and the geodetic displacement.
Everitt also wanted to measure the even feebler frame-dragging effect, in which the spinning Earth should yank and twist the surrounding spacetime.
The subtler frame-dragging effect is the way a rotating massive object pulls space-time around with it as it spins, like a spinning ball in a bowl of molasses.
The much smaller frame-dragging effect from the Earth's rotation, though, remained hidden in the noisy data.
We have some glimpses of the frame-dragging effect," Everitt said, adding that his team still hopes to measure it to 1 percent accuracy, as initially planned.