franc

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franc

1. the former standard monetary unit of France, most French dependencies, Andorra, and Monaco, divided into 100 centimes; replaced by the euro in 2002
2. the former standard monetary unit of Belgium (Belgian franc) and Luxembourg (Luxembourg franc), divided into 100 centimes; replaced by the euro in 2002
3. the standard monetary unit of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, divided into 100 centimes
4. the standard monetary unit, comprising 100 centimes, of the following countries: Benin, Burkina-Faso, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, C?te d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and Togo
5. the standard monetary unit of Burundi (Burundi franc), Comoros (Comorian franc), Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Za?re; Congolese franc), Djibouti (Djibouti franc), Guinea (Guinea franc), Madagascar (franc malgache), Rwanda (Rwanda franc), and French Polynesia and New Caledonia (French Pacific franc)

Franc

 

(1) The monetary unit of France; it is divided into 100 centimes. A French franc with a gold content of 0.29032258 g of fine gold was introduced to replace the livre; it was in circulation from 1799 to 1914. A franc with this gold content is used as a unit of account by the Bank for International Settlements and the Universal Postal Union. The gold content of the franc has been lowered several times (to 0.05985 g of fine gold in 1928, 0.00746113 g in 1945, and 0.0018 g in 1958). On Jan. 1, 1960, a new franc, equivalent to 100 old francs, was introduced. From Apr. 24, 1972, to Jan 19, 1974, and from July 10, 1975, to Mar. 15, 1976, the franc was included in the system of limited exchange rate fluctuations of the countries in the Common Market (±2.25 percent against the central exchange rate).

The French franc is the monetary unit of France’s overseas departments (Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, and Reunion), the overseas territories of St. Pierre and Miquelon, and the principality of Monaco. According to the rate of exchange of the State Bank of the USSR of June 1977, 100 French francs were equivalent to 15 rubles.

(2) Either of two monetary units introduced on the basis of a decree by the French government on Dec. 26, 1945, for countries in Africa and the Pacific included in the franc zone (seeCURRENCY ZONES). In 1960 the franc used in Africa was named the franc of the Communauté Financière Africaine (CFA franc), and in 1967 the Pacific franc was named the franc of the Communauté Financière du Pacifique.

The CFA franc is the monetary unit of Benin (formerly Dahomey), the Ivory Coast, Upper Volta, Gabon, Cameroon, the Comoros, the Congo, Niger, Senegal, Togo, the Central African Republic, and Chad, with 50 CFA francs being equal to one French franc. The franc is also the monetary unit of Mali (100 Malian francs equaling one French franc); according to the June 1977 rate of exchange of the State Bank of the USSR, 1,000 Malian francs were equivalent to one ruble 50 kopeks. Djibouti (Afars and Issas) also uses the franc, with 38.6 Djibouti francs equivalent to one French franc. The Pacific franc is the monetary unit of New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and the islands of Wallis and Futuna; 18.18 Pacific francs are equivalent to one French franc. The franc is also the monetary unit of the New Hebrides, a joint possession of Great Britain and France; 16.16 New Hebrides francs are equivalent to one French franc.

(3) The monetary unit of Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Burundi, Rwanda, and Madagascar. The Belgian and Luxembourg francs are equal in value and are included in the system of limited exchange rate fluctuations in the Common Market. According to the June 1977 rates of exchange of the State Bank of the USSR, 100 Belgian francs were equivalent to two rubles six kopeks, and 100 Swiss francs were equivalent to 29 rubles 47 kopeks.

E. D. ZOLOTARENKO

References in classic literature ?
Certainly, two hundred and forty thousand francs are not be picked up for the asking,' said M.
To explain the problematic existence of the chevalier, the historian, whom Truth, that cruel wanton, grasps by the throat, is compelled to say that after the "glorious" sad days of July, Alencon discovered that the chevalier's nightly winnings amounted to about one hundred and fifty francs every three months; and that the clever old nobleman had had the pluck to send to himself his annuity in order not to appear in the eyes of a community, which loves the main chance, to be entirely without resources.
Confiding in the future of the Restoration, he finally placed his money on the Grand-Livre at the moment when the funds were at fifty-six francs and twenty-five centimes.
You who have chateau, meadows, mountains, woods -- you who have forty thousand francs a year -- you -- are -- not -- happy?
A half year's pension was nearly due at the moment the great change occurred, and the day of payment arrived and passed, leaving these two females literally without twenty francs.
Of course I knew it was true, as true as the fifty thousand francs profit you make," at which remark Baisemeaux stamped on the ground.
Next morning he had emerged from his hotel in a flannel suit so light that it had been unanimously condemned as impossible by his Uncle Robert, his Aunt Louisa, his Cousins Percy, Eva, and Geraldine, and his Aunt Louisa's mother, and at a shop in the Rue Lasalle had spent twenty francs on a Homburg hat.
The stranger said, "Well, give me the seven francs again, and I will see what I can do"--and when he got them, he handed the hackman half a franc, and he immediately asked for two cents to buy a drink with.
I'm painting the portrait of a retired plumber for two hundred francs.
After thirty-three years of married life, and twenty-nine years of toil in a government office, the property of "the Saillards"--their circle of acquaintance called them so--consisted of sixty thousand francs entrusted to Falleix, the house in the place Royale, bought for forty thousand in 1804, and thirty-six thousand francs given in dowry to their daughter Elisabeth.
But as formerly the French paid before singing, so now they paid after having had their laugh, and they subscribed for a sum of 1,253,930 francs.
If we could obtain permission from the Municipal Council to make a hard road, so as to put us in communication with the highway to Grenoble, the deputy-mayor would be the first gainer by it; for instead of dragging his timber over rough tracks at a great expense, a good road through the canton would enable him to transport it more easily, and to engage in a traffic on a large scale, in all kinds of wood, that would bring in money--not a miserable six hundred francs a year, but handsome sums which would mean a certain fortune for him some day.