Frederick Barbarossa


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Related to Frederick Barbarossa: Frederick II, Holy Roman Empire, Richard the Lionheart, Saladin

Frederick Barbarossa:

see Frederick IFrederick I
or Frederick Barbarossa
[Ital.,=red beard], c.1125–90, Holy Roman emperor (1155–90) and German king (1152–90), son of Frederick of Hohenstaufen, duke of Swabia, nephew and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Conrad III.
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, Holy Roman emperor.

Barbarossa, Frederick:

see Frederick IFrederick I
or Frederick Barbarossa
[Ital.,=red beard], c.1125–90, Holy Roman emperor (1155–90) and German king (1152–90), son of Frederick of Hohenstaufen, duke of Swabia, nephew and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Conrad III.
..... Click the link for more information.
, Holy Roman Emperor.

Frederick Barbarossa

official title Frederick I. ?1123--90, Holy Roman Emperor (1155--90), king of Germany (1152--90). His attempt to assert imperial rights in Italy ended in his defeat at Legnano (1176) and the independence of the Lombard cities (1183)
References in periodicals archive ?
Cultivating fields that their colleague Reuter had plowed before dying suddenly, medievalists explore problems in comparative history, Charlemagne and the paradoxes of power, the aetheling Aethelwold and West Saxon royal succession 899-902, the Sonderweg and other myths in Ottonian history, Henry II and Frederick Barbarossa as seen by their contemporaries, the ideology of the 10th-century Benedictine reform, chapters in the life of archbishop Daibert, editing a medieval text as demonstrated on work by Nicholas of Clairvaux, and Timothy Reuter and the edition of Wibald of Stavelot's letter collection for the Momumenta Germaniae Historica.
He was mainly preoccupied with preserving papal authority against both Frederick Barbarossa, whom he crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 1155, and the Norman king of Sicily.
Walther Darte appears consistently without the first initial; the term Wehrmacht refers to the German armed forces as of 1935, not during the First World War or before; historians generally do not attribute the founding of the First Reich to Frederick Barbarossa in the twelfth century; and the description of the German revolution of 1918 more accurately describes the Russian revolutions of 1917--the German troops in the line did not mutiny, and it is incorrect to state that prior to the signing of the 1918 armistice, front-line German soldiers "simply dropped their rifles, picked up their kit bags, and walked home.
Frederick Barbarossa pledges obedience to Alexander III at Venice.
Finally, mention must be made of Bjorn Weiler's contribution, 'The King as Judge: Henry II and Frederick Barbarossa as seen by their contemporaries'.
And here they remained until 1164 when Archbishop Reinald von Dassel of Cologne brought them back with him to that city, having been granted them by the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa.
Rogers takes up in turn the Near East during the impact of the First Crusade, the capture of the Palestinian coastal cities, Norman siege warfare in Sicily and southern Italy, the struggles of the Lombard cities with each other and with Frederick Barbarossa, the Luso-Hispanic Reconquest in Iberia, and the development of seaborne siege campaigning, this last largely in the hands of the Italian maritime cities.
There were problems with the Normans in the south and with the Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick Barbarossa.
Born in Italy in 1194, heir to the Hohenstaufen territories in Germany and grandson of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, he was also the heir to the Norman kingdom of Sicily.
And on the other (and for reasons which are far from clear), Anglo-American scholars began to interest themselves in the subject, with the result that in 1998 the world of the Cid is as accessible to anglophone students of the European Middle Ages as the worlds of Frederick Barbarossa and St Louis, and Simon Barton can afford to take a great deal for granted in a thoroughly researched study in which he is able to present the aristocracy of twelfth-century Leon and Castile in much the same terms as J.

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