Free French


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Free French

 

(La France Libre), until July 1942, the official name of the World War II movement under General C. de Gaulle; its goal was the liberation of France from the fascist German invaders and their minions. In July 1942, as the anti-Hitlerite struggle gained momentum, the Free French took the name “Fighting French” (La France Combattante). The headquarters of the Free French was in London.

References in periodicals archive ?
While British and Free French objectives in Indo-China were broadly consistent, their plans were frustrated by the remoteness and relative strategic insignificance of the Indo-Chinese peninsula for much of the war.
After Syria, the Free French troops were redeployed in North Africa, being reinforced by other French units.
There are many stories of the stormy relationship between De Gaulle and Winston Churchill, who once said: "The heaviest cross I had to bear during the wartime years was the cross of Lorraine" - the badge of the Free French.
303 Mark VII--some Free French and Algerian troops were issued British No.
General Charles de Gaulle, the vocal, opinionated, and argumentative 53-year-old leader of the Free French forces, saw things differently.
Likewise, the Free French sailors sailed in borrowed Allied vessels.
The recipients are not all D-Day veterans but soldiers, sailors and airmen, who also fought alongside the Free French to rid their country of the German invaders.
Leamington library, on the Parade, is hosting free French for all this evening from 6pm to 7.
Sugar Free Mango, Sugar Free Peach, Sugar Free French Vanilla and Sugar Free Coffee.
Montgomery and de Gaulle Bernard Montgomery was a British field marshal and one of the leading Allied commanders; Charles de Gaulle was the leader of the Free French resistance to the Nazis.
If you don't mind the rain, go to the mile-long Esplanade for stunning views across the Clyde, or go and see the Free French Memorial on Lyle Hill, a spectacular viewpoint and memorial to the members of the Free French Navy stationed on the Clyde during World War II.
This tribute to the official leader of the Free French movement, who kept the bond between Britain and France alive in the early 1940s, when Nazi Germany menaced Europe and the British Isles, was largely ignored by the British government, media, and general public.