Free French

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Free French

 

(La France Libre), until July 1942, the official name of the World War II movement under General C. de Gaulle; its goal was the liberation of France from the fascist German invaders and their minions. In July 1942, as the anti-Hitlerite struggle gained momentum, the Free French took the name “Fighting French” (La France Combattante). The headquarters of the Free French was in London.

References in periodicals archive ?
Philippe Leclerc--landed at Utah Beach in Normandy on 1 August 1944 together with other follow-on Free French forces, eventually led the drive toward Paris.
Along with their American and British allies, Free French forces continued to drive the Germans from southern France, liberating the strategic ports of Toulon and Marseilles, then moving northeastward into Alsace to join the Western Allies' final thrust into Germany.
Caption: The British Bren Gun was the light machine gun most widely supplied to Free French forces, and is often seen alongside U.
The British transferred the mandate administration agreed to after World War I, to Free French forces appointing General Catroux as Delegate-General and Plenipotentiary.
The 5th Indian Brigade and the Free French Force would march on Damascus.
Charles De Gaulle's Free French forces in the early years.
Caption: The British began almost immediately to arm the Free French forces with No.
Those who saw the Vichy regime as collaborationist refused to accept the armistice and answered the call of General de Gaulle, who had gone into exile in England and created the Free French Forces there.
Others were transferred to Free French forces (see below).
In 1941, the Free French forces received additional 1911 and 1911A1 pistols from the U.
Fearing that Vichy would allow the stationing of German forces that could threaten the Suez Canal and Iraqi oil fields, in 1941 British and Free French forces invaded and took control of Syria.
In 1941, fearing that the Vichy authorities would allow Nazi Germany to move aircraft and supplies through Syria to threaten the Suez Canal and the Middle Eastern oil fields, British and Free French forces invaded Syria and Lebanon, which were occupied with little resistance.