Free Soilers


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Free Soilers

 

members of a mass, radical democratic party in the USA during the 1840’s and 1850’s. The Free Soil Party, formed in 1848, enjoyed the support of labor organizations, craftsmen, and radical strata of the bourgeoisie and intelligentsia. The Free Soilers advocated free distribution of land from the public domain to homesteaders and the prohibition of land sales to capitalist companies; they opposed the spread of slavery to the new territories. They took part in the armed struggle against slaveholding in Kansas during the period 1854–56. After the creation of the Republican Party in 1854, the Free Soilers became part of the party’s left, radical democratic wing.

References in periodicals archive ?
In Washington as a Free Soiler, Chase was marginalized in the Senate.
The party also received an unexpected boost when a number of influential Free Soilers and Democrats campaigned against the Constitution.
The towns' only weekly newspaper, the Villager, broke its policy of political independence and tabbed Democrat Jonathan Nayson and Free Soiler Nahum Osgood "Ten Hour" candidates for state representative.
He gained support from fellow California settlers and former free soilers who felt that government should promote a "civilized," free society in the West.
By 1848, however, homestead measures gathered support from free soilers and abolitionists.
He carried guns and weapons to the Free Soilers who were emigrating to the Kansas Territory in the 1850s.
Those opposed to slavery's movement into the territories--lumping together Barnburners, Free Soilers, Liberty Party people, and Republicans--often did not drag emancipation into their advocacy.
Yet as the nation cleaved over the issue of chattel slavery, Missourians found themselves squarely in two lines of fire, one from the abolitionists who aimed at slaveholders in general and another from the Free Soilers who targeted slaveholding Westerners directly.
Denying slaveholders their constitutional right to property, and thus to freedom, was in effect the denial of equality, yet another proof that Free Soilers, not slaveholders, intended to destroy democracy in the nation.
3) Despite the obvious resemblance in language, few historians of Illinois and the Midwest have highlighted the similarities between the rhetoric that shaped the political discourse in Illinois during the 1820s and the language employed by Free Soilers and Republicans during the political controversies of the 1840s and 1850s.
Before 1856 these representatives were Democrats, Whigs, and Free Soilers.
As map 7 depicts, the representatives of the lakes--Whigs, Free Soilers, and Democrats--backed the Rivers and Harbors bill of February 1851.

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