French West Africa


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French West Africa,

former federation of eight French overseas territories. The constituent territories were Dahomey (now Benin), French Guinea (now Guinea), French Sudan (now Mali), Côte d'Ivoire, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, and Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso). The federation was created in 1895 to consolidate the French holdings in W Africa and was definitively constituted in 1904. It was ruled by a governor-general, who resided first in Saint-LouisSaint-Louis
, city (1988 pop. 160,689), NW Senegal, a port at the mouth of the Senegal River. The terminus of a railroad from Dakar, it is a fishing, trade, and export center for peanuts, hides, and skins.
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, then in DakarDakar
, city (1988 pop. 672,991), capital of Senegal, W Senegal, on Cape Verde Peninsula, a port on the Atlantic Ocean. Situated in a market-gardening region, Dakar is Senegal's largest city and its administrative, communications, and economic center.
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. During World War II the federation supported the Vichy government until Nov., 1942, when it accepted the authority of the Free French. In 1958 the constituent territories became autonomous republics in the French CommunityFrench Community,
established in 1958 by the constitution of the Fifth French Republic to replace the French Union. Its members consisted of the French Republic, which included metropolitan France (continental France, Corsica, Algeria and the Sahara), the overseas territories
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, except for Guinea, which became independent. The federation was dissolved in 1959.

French West Africa

 

a political and administrative association of French colonial possessions in West Africa that was created between 1895 and 1904 and existed until October 1958. In 1958 it included Senegal, Mauritania, the French Sudan, Guinea, the Ivory Coast, Upper Volta, Dahomey, and Niger. The colonies were administered from Dakar in Senegal.

Under pressure from the anti-imperialist movement, which gained momentum after World War II, the French government in 1958 granted the colonies the status of autonomous republics within French West Africa. At that time Guinea opted for independence. In 1960 independence was declared by the Ivory Coast, Dahomey, Upper Volta, Niger, and Mauritania. Senegal and the Sudanese Republic (the former French Sudan) merged in April 1959 to form the Mali Federation, which declared its independence in June 1960. When Senegal seceded in August 1960 the Sudanese Republic was proclaimed the Republic of Mali.

French West Africa

a former group (1895--1958) of French Overseas Territories: consisted of Senegal, Mauritania, French Sudan, Burkina-Faso, Niger, French Guinea, the Ivory Coast, and Dahomey
References in periodicals archive ?
The RDA was a political party in French West Africa formed in Bamako, Mali, in 1946; initially it had ties to the PCF, but Houphouet-Boigny soon led the party to a more moderate, pro-French stance.
Charles de Gaulle's provisional government assumed control of all French West Africa.
Bill Adelson, Chief Technology Officer of Envision Solar, commented, "we designed this system as a comprehensive integrated solution to bring energy to rural parts of French West Africa.
Subjects up for debate will include US cotton and farm policies, the cotton market in China, French West Africa and Brazil, and predictions for world demand.
The ranks of the French army held more than 100,000 black soldiers whom the French had recruited and mobilized from the areas of Mauritania, Senegal, and Niger in French West Africa, placing them into either all-black or mixed-race regiments and then making them part of Colonial Infantry divisions.
As it turned out, the little building was purely utilitarian, a prefabricated house conceived and built by the French constructeur Jean Prouve for use in colonial French West Africa.
The Baha'i community of Senegal, along with the other national Baha'i communities of former French West Africa, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2003.
Emma joined the Department of State Foreign Service in 1951 and was assigned to the embassy in Dakar, French West Africa (now Senegal).
The city was the administrative capital of French West Africa, a colonial territory which included Mali, Burkina Paso and Cote d'Ivoire.
The three books he published relating his travels--Black Power, The Color Curtain, and Pagan Spain--and a fourth that would report on a trip into French West Africa that he was planning at the time of his death, embody an interchange between appropriation and application.