French landing

French landing

A landing with lots of power on. Also refers to a landing in which the airplane rolls along the ground on its two main wheels, holding the tail in the air as long as possible before coming to a stop.
References in periodicals archive ?
Revima, French landing gear specialist has inked a non-exclusive 10 year overhaul service Agreement with Emirates.
The embassy release further revealed that the French Landing Platform Dock (LPD) Siroco, a flagship of the EU Naval Force Atalanta, released the 11 Indian crew members of a dhow that had been attacked by suspected pirates at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden.
Commenting on a theatre production at the 2004 anniversary that wrongly has the French landing at Port-Royal in 1604, he writes:
The French landing at Fishguard in 1797 had caused all kinds of panic and alarmthe length and breadth of Wales.
The movements of the rebel force as it criss-crossed the county, gathering recruits as it waited for an expected French landing of troops and arms, have been painstakingly plotted by Frances Dickinson, as the latest project in her 30-year fascination with the Radcliffes and the castle and chapel they left behind at Dilston.
That freedom to float free of any particular body also take us on a disastrous Royalist French landing upon the now Republican French coast--even while the brothers just mentioned remain hundreds of miles behind, in London.
As the story is written, the listener seemingly flies along with the narrator, observing the comings and goings in and around French Landing.
Ray Webster, easyJet chief executive, said he is lobbying Cohor, the body that allocates French landing slots, for their full entitlement at Orly.
As the century drew to a close they also celebrated the 200th anniversary of the French landing in Fishguard in 1797.
Heritage Place, 227 French Landing Drive, Nashville: Through a related entity, MHP Associates, LLC, The Mathews Company purchased this 107,000-square-foot Class A office building in February 2004 at a time when it was approximately 50 percent leased.
John George (a good Pembrokeshire name) served in the British navy during the war against Napoleon, whom he detested with more than just professional fervour, perhaps because in 1797 he had witnessed the French landing at Fishguard.