coefficient of friction

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coefficient of friction

[¦kō·ə′fish·ənt əv ′frik·shən]
(mechanics)
The ratio of the frictional force between two bodies in contact, parallel to the surface of contact, to the force, normal to the surface of contact, with which the bodies press against each other. Also known as friction coefficient.

coefficient of friction

The ratio of the force causing a body to slide along a plane (in the direction of sliding) to the normal force pressing the two surfaces together.
References in periodicals archive ?
The frictional coefficient [lambda] is represented similarly to equation 12 for smooth bore tube of constant diameter (D), but with [C.
As mentioned earlier, calculating frictional coefficient in area of mixed lubrication requires knowledge of contact surfaces boundary frictional coefficient.
Equation 24 indicates that the compaction coefficient is influenced by the geometrical parameters of the equipment, frictional coefficients and K.
That is, the oscillation width is determined by the difference between the static and dynamic frictional coefficients.
In particular, not only are good tribological properties such as low frictional coefficient, stability, and low wear required but also suitable mechanical properties such as strength, stiffness and impact strength, and high mold-ability, which allow flow molding such as compression and injection molding for mass production are essential.
When the applied load increased further, more wear debris adhered onto the steel ball, a complete transfer film was quickly formed, and the frictional coefficient decreased.
9), (10), using small loadings of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (<1 wt%) in a PC matrix reduces both the wear rate and frictional coefficient of the PC.
It enhanced with the residuals and holding the various frictional coefficients.
b] are the frictional coefficients between the material and the surface of the rotor, the surface of the stator, and the surface of the baffles, respectively.
Besides these parameters, Spiegler (1958) used frictional model equations in which the interactions between all pairs of components (membrane, water and solute) are characterised by resistance and frictional coefficients, which is one of the fundamental treatments of trans-membrane transport processes (Spiegler 1958).
The shallow feed depth or low compression ratio is also appropriate to the frictional coefficients of RPVC, which cause it to feed well.