Chlamydoselachidae

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Chlamydoselachidae

[¦klam·ə‚dō·se′lak·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The frilled sharks, a family of rare deep-water forms having a combination of hybodont and modern shark characteristics.
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com/terrifying-ancient-shark-shared-earth-dinosaurs-caught-portugal-2613499) recent catch of a frilled shark (Chlamydoselachus anguineus) by researchers off the coast of Portugal has once again dragged this prehistoric marine monster out of the ocean depths and into the limelight.
Another unusual bodily trait the frilled shark exhibits is its jaws, which end where its head ends.
Then there's the Frilled Shark which has 200 teeth and catches its prey like a snake.
Then there's the frilled shark, which has 200 teeth and catches its prey like a snake.
Those dedicated to the Frill Shark are: "The Natural History of the Frilled Shark Chlamydoselachus anguineus" (Gudger and Smith, 1933); "The Anatomy of the Frilled Shark Chlamydoselachus anguineus Garman" (Smith, 1937); and "The Breeding Habits, Reproductive Organs, and External Embryonic Development of Chlamydoselachus Based on Notes and Drawings Left by Bashford Dean" (Gudger, 1940).
For general readers, Bright, a freelance author, scriptwriter, and former TV producer from the UK, describes shark biology and behavior; shark fossils and history, including primitive sharks living today (the goblin shark, frilled shark, sixgill and sevengill sharks, sleeper sharks, and megamouth); the great white shark and its relatives; requiem sharks and hammerheads; sharks without the typical fusiform shape, including flat sharks, camouflaged sharks, the dogfish, the whale shark, and catsharks; and their interactions with people, including attacks and conservation.
Scientists recently videotaped a frilled shark snaking through shallow waters near Tokyo, Japan.
Scientists consider frilled sharks "living fossils.
So one can imagine the surprise that researchers from Portugal's Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere were in for when they caught a frilled shark (Chlamydoselachus anguineus) recently.
Food habits of the frilled shark Chlamydoselachus anguineus collected from Suruga Bay, central Japan.
The duo will see goblin sharks as well as sawsharks, ghost sharks, frilled sharks and the luminescent lantern shark.