frontal sinus

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Related to Frontal sinuses: ethmoid sinusitis

frontal sinus

[¦frənt·əl ′sī·nəs]
(anatomy)
Either of a pair of air spaces within the frontal bone above the nasal bridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
8,9) There are case reports of extremely rare primary sinonasal ameloblastomas but no previous reports were found of extension of a benign maxillary ameloblastoma into the frontal sinuses, as in this case.
The spread of the infection from the frontal sinuses intracranially usually occurs by progressive thrombophlebitis through valveless diploic veins.
Pain when the forehead over the frontal sinuses is touched may indicate inflammation of the frontal sinuses.
The posterior table of both frontal sinuses was intact, but the table on the left side was attenuated (figure 3).
Endoscopic surgical access to the frontal sinuses is difficult because of narrow, complex anatomical features that necessitate the use of specialized instrumentation," said Bryan Jones, PhD, microbiologist and associate product manager for Rhinology in the ENT division at Medtronic.
With more force, the fracture progresses to involve the thick glabellar bone, the frontal sinuses, and the medial and inferior orbital rims.
Hormonal changes can similarly cause dilation and growth of the frontal sinuses because of promotion of osteoblast and osteoclast activity.
Contrast-enhanced CT of the sinuses revealed mucoperiosteal thickening of the right sphenoid and frontal sinuses and opacification of the left sphenoid sinus (figure 3).
Abnormal expansions of the frontal sinuses have also been given the diagnosis of pneumocele, pneumosinus frontalis, sinus hypertrophy, aerocele, hyperpneumatization, and sinus ectasia.
The multiple defects involved the anterior and posterior walls of the frontal sinuses, the fovea ethmoidalis bilaterally, the cribriform plate, the far-right lateral floor of the sphenoid sinus, and both lateral sphenoid walls.
The tumor extended into the right ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinuses, the right medial orbital wall, and the orbital apex.
CT showed partial opacification of the left maxillary, ethmoid, and frontal sinuses with nasal mucosal swelling and an obvious extension of the inflammatory process to the inferomedial orbital wall, which displaced the globe anterolaterally (figure 1).