Frontinus


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Frontinus

(Sextus Julius Frontinus) (frŏntī`nəs), fl. A.D. 74, Roman administrator and writer. As governor of Britain from A.D. 74 or A.D. 75 to A.D. 78, he reduced the Silures, a rebellious tribe in SE Wales, and pacified Britain within its borders; it was this work, successfully done, that probably rendered possible the achievements of Frontinus' successor, AgricolaAgricola
(Cneius Julius Agricola) , c.A.D. 40–A.D. 93, Roman general, conqueror of Britain. After a distinguished military and political career (partly in Britain), he was made consul (A.D. 77) and was governor (A.D. 78?–A.D. 85?) of Britain.
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. From his experience as curator aquarum, or water commissioner, he wrote De aquis urbis Romae, which treats exhaustively of the water supply of Rome, with complete descriptions and history of the aqueducts. He also wrote the Strategematica, which is important as a guide to Roman military tactics and strategy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sextus Julius Frontinus, a Roman senator of the first century AD, is best known for technical treatises, including one on military matters, Stratagems.
Although Vegetius gave his advice in the late 4th and early 5th century AD, a lot of his ideas derive from earlier sources like Frontinus who wrote in the 1st century AD; see Frontin.
Sextus Julius Frontinus was sent into Roman Britain in 74AD to succeed Quintus Petillius Cerialis as governor, establishing a new base at Caerleon for Legio II Augusta and a network of smaller Roman forts 15km to 20km apart for his Roman auxiliary units.
Following Frontinus and other ancient writers, Bacci provides a detailed account of the construction of the aqueducts in antiquity.
Leaving aside the incongruity of a classical author, whether Cornelius Fronto or Frontinus, writing about modern artillery, we can concentrate our attention on the adverbial phrase "de praesent" as applied to the Abbey of Theleme, which is first described in the last six chapters of Gargantua and mentioned occasionally in subsequent books.
All of them, from the Roman engineering expert Sextus Julius Frontinus, who said 2,000 years ago that everything useful had already been invented, to Astronomer Royal Sir Harold Spencer Jones, who, in 1957, dismissed the idea of space flight as "bunk" - a fortnight before the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1.
The mostra terminale--the celebratory facade of a terminal castellum--was a revival, or perhaps more accurately a reinterpretation, of an ancient building type whose conception and construction had been encouraged by the rediscovery in the early fifteenth century of an important Roman text, the De aquis urbis Romae, whose author, Sextus Julius Frontinus (c.
Aemilius Frontinus, and he had a brother who was also a member of the Roman senate.
These beginnings of modern warfare were heavily indebted to a reading of such classical authors as Julius Frontinus and Claudius Aelianus, and to a retrieval of the Greek and Roman strategy and tactics which rang the death knell for the radically different methods of the medieval world.
Built c55 AD, the Roman fort or castrum was part of a system of frontier posts from a legion based at Caerleon, founded by the Roman general Julius Frontinus upon his conquest of the Silures, a powerful and warlike tribe of ancient Britain who occupied South Wales.
While the measurements for the water volume at their intakes are close for the Claudia and Marcia, Frontinus describes the Claudia as overly abundant.
His source for identifying the authors is the biography of Milton by his nephew Edward Phillips, who was himself one of the tutees: "Of the Latin, the four grand authors De Re Rustica, Cato, Varro, Columella and Palladius; Cornelius Celsus, an ancient physician of the Romans; a great part of Pliny's Natural History; Vitruvius his Architecture; Frontinus his Stratagems; with the two egregious poets, Lucretius and Manilius" (1, cited from the Hughes edition, John Milton: Complete Poems and Major Prose, 1029).