fry

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Fry

1. Christopher. born 1907, English dramatist; author of the verse dramas A Phoenix Too Frequent (1946), The Lady's Not For Burning (1948), and Venus Observed (1950)
2. Elizabeth. 1780--1845, English prison reformer and Quaker
3. Roger Eliot. 1866--1934, English art critic and painter who helped to introduce the postimpressionists to Britain. His books include Vision and Design (1920) and C?zanne (1927)
4. Stephen (John). born 1957, British writer, actor, and comedian; his novels include The Liar (1991) and The Stars' Tennis Balls (2000)

fry

(1)
To fail. Said especially of smoke-producing hardware failures. More generally, to become non-working. Usage: never said of software, only of hardware and humans. See fried, magic smoke.

fry

(2)
To cause to fail; to roach, toast, or hose a piece of hardware. Never used of software or humans, but compare fried.
References in classic literature ?
At intervals one of her hands raised itself in the air, shook an imaginary frying-pan, and dropped again with a faint thump on the cookery-book in her lap.
asked the reporter, pouring his omelette into the frying-pan.
The rattle and bang of the frying-pan was grating horribly on my nerves.
However, as it was brown, even to Bella's taste, the young lady graciously partook of it without reconsignment to the frying-pan, and also, in due course, of the contents of the two bottles: whereof one held Scotch ale and the other rum.
The frying-pan of which Lebeziatnikov had spoken was not there, at least Raskolnikov did not see it.
The first to captivate and take his fancy were the pots, out of which he would have very gladly helped himself to a moderate pipkinful; then the wine skins secured his affections; and lastly, the produce of the frying-pans, if, indeed, such imposing cauldrons may be called frying-pans; and unable to control himself or bear it any longer, he approached one of the busy cooks and civilly but hungrily begged permission to soak a scrap of bread in one of the pots; to which the cook made answer, "Brother, this is not a day on which hunger is to have any sway, thanks to the rich Camacho; get down and look about for a ladle and skim off a hen or two, and much good may they do you.
Those turf-heaps, mounds of potter's clay, melted at the word of the soldiers like butter in the frying-pans of Friesland housewives.
The bowl of batter was on the hob and the frying-pan was heating up when we came in.