Fucose


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Related to Fucose: glucose, Rhamnose, sialic acid

Fucose

 

(also 6-deoxy-galactose), a monosaccharide of the de-oxyhexose class. Fucose is found in many natural compounds, in which it occurs mainly in the L-form. It is found in the L-form, for example, in certain bacterial and plant polysaccharides, in oligosaccharides in milk, and in glycoproteins including substances of blood groups. D-fucose is a component of certain plant glycosides. L-fucose has the structural formula

Enzymes known as fucosidases split the fucose radical from polysaccharide molecules.

References in periodicals archive ?
Altogether 12 saccharides and sugar alcohols (glucose, galactose, fructose, arabinose, xylose, ribose, fucose, cellobiose, glucitol, mannitol, arabitol, and myoinositol) were identified using capillary electrophoresis.
As reported in the June Glycobiology, the team eventually identified 50 different oligosaccharides in bovine milk, including structures with fucose.
These differ by the presence of fucose on PSK and rhamnose and arabinose in PSP (Smith 2002, Kidd 2000).
POTELLIGENT(R) Technology involves the reduction of the amount of fucose in the carbohydrate structure of an antibody using a proprietary fucosyltransferase-knockout CHO cell line as a production cell.
Isolation of serological active fucose containing oligosaccharides from human blood group H substance.
The compound that binds to a C-type lectin is preferably chosen from mannose, fucose, plant lectins, antibiotics, sugars, proteins or antibodies against C-type lectins.
2002) including polysaccharides (such as glucans, glycogen and chitin), monosaccharides (such as ribose, fucose, glucose and mannose), disaccharides (such as trehalose and sucrose), and sugar alcohols (such as mannitol) (Beelman et al.
It contains a unique, polymerized glyconutrient ingredient that incorporates all eight essential monosaccharides (glucose, xylose, fucose, N-acetyl galactosmine, mannose, N-Acetyl glucosamine, N-acetyl neuraminic acid and galactose) in a single, non-branched polysaccharide chain.
CA 50 is related to CA 19-9 but lacks a fucose residue.
The acidic polysaccharide has a backbone of (1[right arrow]2)-linked [Alpha]-L-rhamnopyranosyl and (1[right arrow]4)-linked D-galactopyranosyluronic acid residues, with side-chains of fucose and galactose, the former essentially at the non-reducing end.
The first of these to be studied ordered cells to make fucose, a sugar.