Fuggers


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Fuggers

16th-century German financiers. [Ger. Hist.: NCE, 1023–1024]
See: Wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequent chapters describe the people who worked for the Fugger companies, the family's patronage of art, and their participation in society.
In his camp outside, he borrowed a final six thousand florins from the Fuggers in order to prolong the siege.
A name you will come across frequently while walking Augsburg's streets is the Fugger family.
63) Perhaps his direct experiences with the Fuggers and the poorer classes in Augsburg go some way in explaining his trenchant criticisms of usury, including loans at interest to wealthy merchants.
Jena: Gustav Fischer, 1922); ET: idem, Capital and Finance in the Age of the Renaissance: A Study of the Fuggers and Their Connections, trans.
As expected, the Fuggers play a major role in Mathew's study, but their policy towards Lisbon and their activities in Indo-Portuguese trade cover only about one quarter of the entire book.
One section relates to the Fuggers and Rome, other sections summarize their relations with the Spanish Crown, Naples, Hungary, the Netherlands, Antwerp, Florence, and so on.
The burial chapel of the Fugger family, in the Evangelical church of St.
He compares known expenditures for other contemporary projects as a gauge before concluding that, apart from the unfinished brass grille, the Fuggers spent about 15,000-16,000 gulden on their chapel.
102) This is a manuscript drawn up between 1520 and 1550, in which Matthaus Schwarz, a member of the bourgeois class employed by the Fugger bankers, collected 137 illustrations showing him in the clothes worn during the various phases of his life.
16) Both the extensive library and the collection of antiquities resulted from the efforts of Strada, Hans Jacob Fugger (1516-75), and Nicolo Stoppio (d.