Full-cost accounting

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Full-cost accounting

An accounting system in which environmental costs are built directly into the prices of products and services.
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Download a copy of the report Bullying Bosses: A Full Cost Accounting by visiting ExecConf.
But if the main reason sales crested at five units was simply because of lack of consumer knowledge, then an educational approach using full cost accounting should be investigated.
Under full cost accounting, a quarterly "ceiling test" calculation is required using commodity prices as of the end of the reporting period.
Such strategies must include enlightened financial analysis utilizing full cost accounting methods as well as a robust analysis of a corporation's governance structure, business practices, environmental and social policies and performance," she added.
The arbitrary nature of the full cost accounting rules forces us to ignore the value of our hedge positions and the reality of higher prices in the futures market when calculating the magnitude of this write-down," Ackerman said.
8 million (pre-tax) full cost accounting 'ceiling test' impairment charge recorded at Seneca in 2001.
As a result of depressed North American commodity prices, Seneca recorded a non-cash full cost accounting 'ceiling test' impairment charge of $180.
capitalized by the Company under the full cost accounting method.
The full cost accounting rules require a quarterly "ceiling test" and because the SEC's rules allow the Company to calculate the ceiling test charge for the third quarter using the November natural gas Nymex closing price on October 29, 2001, higher natural gas prices on that date could reduce or eliminate the impairment charge.
0 million and under full cost accounting rules will not be a direct charge to first quarter 2001 results.
8 million, respectively in non-cash (after-tax) impairments of oil and gas assets under the full cost accounting rules mandated by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
The non-cash writedown, which is mandated by the Securities and Exchange Commission accounting rules, require companies using full cost accounting to value their oil and gas assets at the lower of net book value or a valuation based on oil and gas prices at a point in time, without escalation, for the life of the reserves.