Full-cost accounting

Full-cost accounting

An accounting system in which environmental costs are built directly into the prices of products and services.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study undertook a full-cost accounting review of food waste and leaf-and-yard waste composting throughout the region, as compared to other waste management options such as landfill and waste-to-energy (WTE).
Another perspective argues that full-cost accounting requires a broader measure of the costs of water supply, one that includes the opportunity costs of all productive resources used to supply water--such as the opportunity costs of raw water withdrawn by the water agency, (6) the costs of protecting water sources, and the costs of any reduction in environmental quality that occurs from the operations of water or sewage agencies.
NASA officials acknowledged that, as part of their implementation strategy, they had not yet converted the module to support full-cost accounting.
Recognizing that full-cost accounting is necessary to link budget and performance integration, the Bush administration has transmitted to Congress legislative changes that will improve accountability and make budgeting and management in the executive branch more performance-oriented.
That met rigorous requirements for full-cost accounting.
Enserch Corp said the 1996 10-K filed by its 83 percent-owned exploration and production subsidiary, Enserch Exploration Inc, indicated recent declines in natural gas and oil prices are likely to require Enserch Exploration to write down its total assets at the end of the first quarter trader full-cost accounting.
Fortunately, now almost everyone in the economics profession agrees on the need for full-cost accounting.
Today's mainstream environmentalists seem to be offering the same, although the technological panaceas - pollution credits, full-cost accounting, and corporate environmentalism - are more sophisticated.
We do have a rule that requires oil and gas companies using full-cost accounting to write down the cost of their assets when it is in excess of certain ceilings.
5 million due to the impairment of the company's oil and gas properties under full-cost accounting rules.
6 million via a ceiling test write-down under the full-cost accounting method.