fundamental unit

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fundamental unit

[¦fən·də¦ment·əl ′yü·nət]
(physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as feedback provides an understanding of the fundamental dimensions of learning, each of the fundamental dimensions of an exemplary Extension office needs clarity (Clynes & Raftery, 2008).
Factor analysis has been applied in this study in order to identify the fundamental dimensions underlying the original 24 service quality attributes in Indonesian Islamic banking using 0.
Pope Benedict XVI has certainly shown in his own person how these three fundamental dimensions are in necessary relationship.
Furthermore, it has been shown that these two fundamental dimensions of social perception relate to each other in a compensatory manner (Judd, James-Hawkins, Yzerbyt, & Kashima, 2005).
Claassen imagines this to be true both of the range of psychological types generated by his fundamental dimensions and of various sectors of society.
While the notion of "gift" has grown in importance in both philosophy and theology, Bruaire offers something quite rare in contemporary thought: a genuine metaphysical account of gift, an attempt to think through the most fundamental dimensions of reality in terms of an ultimately incalculable generosity.
You can improve value as perceived by the customer by focusing on the improvements of the four fundamental dimensions of value.
These three fundamental dimensions of storage depicted in Figure 1 form the basis for storage system strategies.
Thus, although both teenage pregnancy prevention culture and Hispanic culture value marriage, the fundamental dimensions of teenage pregnancy prevention culture directly contradict Hispanic cultural traditions that place the highest value on family and motherhood roles for women.
For individuals, finding their future career path implies determining the vocational context, with fundamental dimensions that correspond to essential traits that typify a person's own individuality.
A generous critic, Tormey is prepared to give Heller the benefit of the doubt here, suggesting there are potentially radical implications in her view that what she identifies as the three fundamental dimensions of the modern experience -- technology, a functional division of labour and statecraft -- could conceivably be concretely enacted in different kinds of institutions, including non-capitalist ones.
Aart de Geus (Synopsys): There are three fundamental dimensions to differentiation: product or technology differentiation, customer proximity and operational efficiency.

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