fundamental region

(redirected from Fundamental domain)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

fundamental region

[¦fən·də¦ment·əl ′rē·jən]
(mathematics)
Any region in the complex plane that can be mapped conformally onto all of the complex plane.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Any Fuchsian Group possesses a connected, convex fundamental domain.
On Relations between Fuchsian Groups, Fundamental Domains and Outer Billiards.
The Ford fundamental domain of a group [GAMMA] is defined in terms of the isometric spheres of the elements of r.
One major problem in the construction of a Dirichlet fundamental domain is the choice of an adequate center.
Let Fbea fundamental domain for the action [GAMMA] on [CHI] (implicitly we assume here that the action of G is so that such a domain exists).
For a given lattice [LAMBDA], we shall denote by [LAMBDA][o] the adjoint lattice [9], by [OMEGA][o] the corresponding fundamental domain, and by [PI][o] the corresponding periodization operator.
Moreover, since F is a fundamental domain of the upper half plane H under the action of PS[L.
The question for us is therefore how one specifies the fundamental domain of a mathematical theory.
This is a fundamental domain acquisition," said Michael Hodgdon, First Light Net's Chairman and Chief Operating Officer.
t] is the number of instantaneous fundamental domains, the number of fundamental fluctuations within the instantaneous spherical shell contained within a t-sliced hypersurface of simultaneity.
They look at complex hyperbolic lattices, rank-one isometries of proper CAT(0)-spaces, trace polynomials for simple loops on the twice punctured torus, the simplicial volume of products and fiber bundles, the homology of Hantzsche-Wendt groups, Seifert fibered structure and rigidity on real Bott towers, exotic circles in groups of piecewise smooth circle homeo-morphisms, and groups generated by spine reflections admitting crooked fundamental domains.
From the nebulous roots and trunk on the tree of life, the three known fundamental domains of life branched out billions of years ago: bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea.

Full browser ?