Fusible Alloys

Fusible Alloys

 

binary or multicomponent metal alloys with a melting point not higher than that of tin (about 232°C). They consist of various proportions of tin, bismuth, indium, lead, cadmium, zinc, antimony, gallium, and mercury (see Table 1). Certain fusible alloys melt within a range of temperatures rather than at a fixed temperature. Most fusible alloys shrink upon hardening, but those containing more than 55 percent bismuth expand.

Table 1. Properties of some fusible alloys
Chemical composition (percent)Melting point (°C)
BiPbSnInOthers
12.520.567 Ga10.6
44.722.68.319.15.3 Cd46.8
50.026.713.310.0 Cd70
52.532.015.595
58.042.0138.5
91.09.0 Zn199
48.028.514.59.0 Sb103–227
67.016.017.096–149

Fusible alloys are used for solder, as fuses in electrical engineering and thermal devices, as dies and models in the preparation of complex metal and plastic casts, and as metallic putty and sealants.

References in periodicals archive ?
For years, Purity Castings consisted of Lambert's grandfather and one other employee manufacturing zinc and aluminum die casting alloys, tin-based babbitts and low-melting fusible alloys.
Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets, solder, pewter, and fusible alloys.
The major end-use segments analyzed are Chemicals, Cosmetics, and Pharmaceuticals, Fusible Alloys, and Metallurgical Additives.