Dostoevsky

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Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, these things are subjective, and one man's Jeffrey Archer is another man's Fyodor Dostoevsky - and believe me, if you see anyone reading either of these blokes I would give them a wide berth at the all-you-can-eat Cajun breakfast buffet.
Curry, who enjoys the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky, grew up in El Segundo.
Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoevsky "I've loved Russian literature ever since I read this book in college, and I will be reading it again to find new meaning.
Based on a fictive monologue in five parts by prolific Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky, the theatrical adaptation of "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man" opened at the Russian Cultural Center on Thursday evening, its premier timed to coincide with World Theater Day.
Fyodor Dostoevsky said that "[t]he degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.
His research has ranged from Fyodor Dostoevsky and Victor Hugo to Ann Petry and Gloria Naylor.
Similarly, the smaller piece, Dostojewski, 1990, is hardly as modest as it may at first appear; it represents the "December" of a twelve-part arithmetical riff on the dates of 1990, which also concerns, eponymously but tangentially, the works of Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky.
A quote by the great Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky at the beginning of the book sums up the renovationist experience: "The socialist who is a Christian is more to be feared than the socialist who is an atheist.
As a scholar affiliated with the prestigious Gorky Institute of World Literature in Moscow, he published articles and books dealing with a wide variety of French and Russian writers and thinkers, including Fyodor Dostoevsky, Albert Camus, Nikolai Berdiaev, and Vasilii Rozanov.
At the Red Cross headquarters in Geneva the words of Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky are inscribed above the door, "In war, everyone is responsible to everyone for everything.
He translations include ''Crime and Punishment'' and ''The Brothers Karamazov'' by legendary Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky.
Peterson centers much of his work on DuBois's concept of "double consciousness," which informs the deep affinity between DuBois and Fyodor Dostoevsky in their roles as literary ethnographers of their respective traditions.