G


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G,

7th letter of the alphabetalphabet
[Gr. alpha-beta, like Eng. ABC], system of writing, theoretically having a one-for-one relation between character (or letter) and phoneme (see phonetics). Few alphabets have achieved the ideal exactness.
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. It is a usual symbol for a voiced velar stop, as in the English go. It was originally a differentiated form of Greek gamma, which has C as its formal Roman correspondent. In musical notationmusical notation,
symbols used to make a written record of musical sounds.

Two different systems of letters were used to write down the instrumental and the vocal music of ancient Greece. In his five textbooks on music theory Boethius (c.A.D. 470–A.D.
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 G represents a note on the scale. In physics, G stands for the gravitational constant (see gravitationgravitation,
the attractive force existing between any two particles of matter. The Law of Universal Gravitation

Since the gravitational force is experienced by all matter in the universe, from the largest galaxies down to the smallest particles, it is often called
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).

g

(mechanics)

G

(electricity)
(mechanics)
A unit of acceleration equal to the standard acceleration of gravity, 9.80665 meters per second per second, or approximately 32.1740 feet per second per second. Also known as fors; grav.
(science and technology)

acceleration of gravity (g)

The acceleration produced by the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. (By international agreement the value of g is 386.089 inches per second square = 32.1740 feet per second square = 9.80665 meters per second square.)

G

1. On drawings, abbr. for “gas.”
2. On drawings, abbr. for girder.

G

(unit)
The abbreviated form of giga-.

G

(language)
["G: A Functional Language with Generic Abstract Data Types", P.A.G. Bailes, Computer Langs 12(2):69-94, 1987].

G

(language)
A language developed at Oregon State University in 1988 which combines functional programming, object-oriented programming, relational, imperative programming and logic programming (you name it we got it).

["The Multiparadigm Language G", J. Placer, Computer Langs 16:235-258, 1991].