glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

(redirected from G6PD)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to G6PD: G6PD deficiency

glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

[′glü‚kōs ¦siks ′fäs‚fāt dē‚hī′drä·jə‚nās]
(biochemistry)
The mammalian enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate by TPN+(triphosphopyridine nucleotide).
References in periodicals archive ?
The most effective management of G6PD deficiency is to prevent haemolysis by avoiding oxidative stress, drugs, foods and infections.
The greatest surprise for the team was when they measured the ageing process in the transgenic mice: the animals with a high G6PD expression and, therefore, high levels of NADPH, delayed their ageing, metabolised sugar better and presented better movement coordination as they aged.
Among the investigated paediatric patients, the prevalence of G6PD deficiency was high, and was significantly associated with anaemia, which contrasted with SCA--another haematologic genetic disorder that was found to have a low prevalence and no significant association with the prevalence of anaemia.
Screening for G6PD deficiency was done by dye decolorization test which is semi quantitative visual colorimetric assay.
G6PD is the principle source of NADPH which is of central importance to cellular redox regulation and any changes in G6PD will alter NADPH levels, thus impact the entire antioxidant system and makes tissues very vulnerable to oxidative damage [42].
This drug can accelerate the hemoglobin reduction process through the NADPH-dependent G6PD pathway.
Though in the case of nitrofurantoin, this does not include patients with G6PD deficiency.
Historically, the South African black population has a low rate of G6PD deficiency, and the enzyme defect locally is generally quantitatively fairly mild, so severe reactions are uncommon.
G6PD is one of the genetic conditions that can be detected through our newborn genetic screening program.
G6PD deficiency is the most common genetic deficiency in the world, mainly affecting Asian, Middle Eastern, African and Mediterranean peoples.
1,2] Some of the most common causes of neonatal jaundice include physiological jaundice, breast feeding or non feeding jaundice, breast milk jaundice, prematurity leading to jaundice & various pathological causes like haemolytic disease, liver dysfunction, neonatal sepsis, deficiency of G6PD enzyme, hypothyroidism and rare conditions such as gilbert's syndrome etc.