Gat

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Gat:

see GhatGhat
or Gat
, walled town, SW Libya, in an oasis in the Sahara, near the Algerian border. It formerly was an important caravan center. Ghat was captured by the Ottoman Turks in 1875, by the Italians in 1930, and by the French in 1943, during World War II.
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, Libya.

gat

[gat]
(navigation)
A natural or artificial passage or channel extending inland through shoals or steep banks.

GAT

GAT

Generalized Algebraic Translator. Improved version of IT. On IBM 650 RAMAC.

[Sammet 1969, p. 142].
References in periodicals archive ?
The chief beneficiaries of this new GATS regime are a breed of corporate service providers determined to expand their global commercial reach and to turn public services into private markets all over the world.
II), the Network Music Opinions (Article 8), and the Several Opinions (Article 4), each is inconsistent with China's national treatment commitments under Article XVII of the GATS.
Additionally, GATS expressly places "developing countries" in a special category that will entitle them to special treatment in the implementation of their national policy objectives.
A There is a heightened awareness of the GATS and its importance within governments in developing countries but they need assistance to understand how to solicit input from businesses, especially if the associations are not aware of the importance of the GATS process.
Mr Lamy also repeated that the GATS negotiations could not force governments to open up their essential public services - and nor was that the EU's aim.
The GATS envisions that recognition issues may also be handled through "Mutual Recognition Agreements" negotiated between GATS Member States.
It is unclear how the expansion of GATS rules might affect the ability of local governments to regulate and provide public services such as health care, education and utilities.
GATS is likely to have a disproportionately negative impact on women, particularly women in developing countries.
The GATS allows members to modify or withdraw commitments, provided that they negotiate offsetting compensation so that the overall level of its market access remains the same.