glycemic index

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glycemic index

[glī¦sēm·ik ′in‚deks]
(medicine)
A ranking of foods based on how they affect blood glucose (sugar) levels in the 2-3 hours after eating, foods with carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion have the highest glycemic indexes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The press and the public have taken a huge interest in the GI diet.
com has a calorie-controlled version of the GI diet that you might want to try.
Dr David Ludwig, who led the team at the Children's Hospital in Boston, said, 'The study findings should give impetus to large-scale trials of low GI diets in humans.
The GI diet encourages people to eat plenty of foods with a low GI value and avoid those with a high GI value, in a bid to help weight loss.
Advocates of the GI diet advise a hearty bowl of porridge first thing in the morning, flavoured with a drizzle of honey and recommend the ancient Irish breakfast as something that will stave off the hunger pangs for longer and urge dieters to eat less.
Researcher Gary Frost, head of nutrition and dietetics at the trust, said, 'The scientific benefits of low GI diets are becoming increasingly clear, and this new research is a further indicator of the potential that including these foods in a balanced diet has.
Celebrities like Naomi Campbell, Kim Catrall and even former American President Bill Clinton have sung the praises of a good old-fashioned bowl of porridge as part of the popular Gi diet.
The GI Diet is based on the Glycemic Index - a medical way of measuring the speed at which foods are broken down by the body to form glucose.
But can the GI diet, which is based on how quickly foods release their energy, really help you lose weight?