Grate

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grate

[grāt]
(engineering)
A support for burning solid fuels; usually made of closely spaced bars to hold the burning fuel, while allowing combustion air to rise up to the fuel from beneath, and ashes to fall away from the burning fuel.

Grate

A frame that consists of parallel metal bars, attached by cross bars at regular intervals; used as a grille or security device.

grate

A surface with suitable openings to support a fuel bed, such as coal, and permit passage of air through the burning fuel. Designed to permit removal of unburned residue, and may be horizontal or inclined, stationary or movable.
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering a GRAT strategy, we first calculate the core capital and then quantify how much wealth to put into GRATs to move the desired amount of excess capital to the next generation over a certain time horizon.
Certainly prior to the newly enacted tax act, the typical taxpayer contemplating a GRAT generally had to be extremely stingy with his or her lifetime gift exemption.
At the end of the GRAT's term, whatever assets are left in the trust are distributed to the trust's beneficiaries and the GRAT is terminated.
When the 7520 rate is lower, the annuity payments needed to zero out the GRAT will be smaller and, thus, at the end of the annuity term, more assets will be available to pass to the ultimate beneficiaries gift tax-free.
Whether the trust employed is a GRIT, GRAT or GRUT the grantor is taxed only on the income generated by the trust.
15) In a zeroed-out GRAT, the annual annuity payments are set so high that the present value of the retained annuity equals the value of the GRAT assets at the time of contribution (i.
The carnage of federal legislation, the battering of family limited partnerships and the threat to various appreciation-removal techniques, such as GRATs, have left an indelible mark on the estate-planning profession.
Clearly, a GRAT is worth considering today because lower interest rates reduce the amount of the annuity that the GRAT must pay.
The basic objective of a GRAT is to shift from the grantor to the remainder beneficiaries the appreciation generated by the contributed property during the GRAT term.
If the trustee does not reinvest the sale proceeds within two years, the trust becomes a GRAT and the grantor will receive an annuity for the remainder of the trust term.
The flowthrough nature of S corporation income makes it an ideal way to fund a GRAT.