Naum Gabo

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Gabo, Naum

(noum gä`bō), 1890–1977, Russian sculptor, architect, theorist, and teacher, brother of Antoine PevsnerPevsner, Antoine
, 1886–1962, Russian sculptor and painter. He was influenced by cubism while in Paris in 1911 and 1913. During World War I he was in Norway with his brother Naum Gabo. They returned to Moscow after the Russian Revolution.
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. Gabo lived in Munich and Norway until the end of the revolution, when he returned to Russia. With Pevsner he wrote the Realist Manifesto (1920), which proposed that new concepts of time and space be incorporated into works of art and that dynamic form replace static mass. His sculptural experiments with constructivismconstructivism,
Russian art movement founded c.1913 by Vladimir Tatlin, related to the movement known as suprematism. After 1916 the brothers Naum Gabo and Antoine Pevsner gave new impetus to Tatlin's art of purely abstract (although politically intended) constructions.
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, a movement he helped found, were often transparent, geometrical abstractions composed of plastics and other materials. Gabo's art conflicted with Soviet art directives. In 1922 he left Moscow for Berlin where he taught at the BauhausBauhaus
, artists' collective and school of art and architecture in Germany (1919–33). The Bauhaus revolutionized art training by combining the teaching of classic arts with the study of crafts.
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, later moving to England and then to the United States. In 1957 he executed a huge public monument in Rotterdam.

Bibliography

See his Gabo (1957) and Of Divers Arts (1962); study by R. Olson and A. Chanin (1948).

Gabo, Naum (b. Neemia Pevsner)

(1890–1977) sculptor; born in Bryansk, Russia. He studied medicine, engineering, and art in Munich (1910–14), then changed his name to distinguish himself from his artist brother, Antoine Pevsner. He and his brother created theories of spatial sculpture in Scandinavia during World War I and published the Realist Manifesto (1920). Naum lived in Berlin (1922–32), Paris (1932–35), and London (1939–46) before settling in Connecticut (1946). He was noted for his constructed sculptures, such as Linear Construction (1943).