Gaddi

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Gaddi

(găd`ī), in the Bible, Manassite sent by Moses into Canaan.

Gaddi

(gäd`dē), celebrated family of Florentine artists. Gaddo Gaddi, c.1260–c.1333, painter and mosaicist, is said by Vasari to have been associated with Cimabue and Giotto. Among the mosaics attributed to him are those in the portico of Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome, and Coronation of the Virgin, over the portal in the Florence cathedral. His son, Taddeo Gaddi, c.1300–c.1366, was a favorite pupil and godson of Giotto, whom he assisted for 24 years. He became the leader of Florentine painting after his master's death. His works include the ceiling painting and a series of frescoes representing scenes from the life of the Virgin in the Baroncelli Chapel in Santa Croce, Florence; the fine Last Supper in the refectory of the same church; remains of frescoes in San Francesco, Pisa; altarpieces (Naples; Berlin; and the Uffizi); and Madonna with Saints (Santa Felicita, Florence). Taddeo's son, Agnolo Gaddi, c.1350–1396, a pupil of his father and of Giovanni di Milano, was also a follower of Giotto. His works are somewhat rigid in design and lack imagination. Among them are frescoes of the Story of the True Cross (Santa Croce, Florence); Life of the Virgin (cathedral, Prato); and four paintings in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaddis recognizes this fact in his approach to value.
Gaddis Farms owns a few "retired" quarter horses that were once vital to the working of the farm, but now enjoy a life of free of responsibility.
From World War to Cold War is a coherent collection of superlative essays on some key issues in diplomatic history, and both this book and that of John Gaddis are highly recommended to those with an interest in the evolution of the international order since the 1940s.
Unlike the postmodern novels of DeLillo and others, which are not realistic and exploit the uncanny, Carpenter's Gothic resorts entirely to incidents that could be drawn from real life; many of them, based on newspaper clippings that Gaddis famously collected, actually are (see Kohn, "Buddhist" 431).
Gaddis argues that "preemption, unilateralism and hegemony" were crucial to nineteenth-century strategies, and that they are "surprisingly relevant" again (p.
But as Gaddis explains, the Russians and the Americans, with their incompatible ideologies, were doomed from the beginning.
Before this, Gaddis claims, the main concern of populations either side of the Berlin Wall was whether they could trust their leaders not to miscalculate events and press the button which would unleash a devastating, new type of warcraft, Mutual Assured Destruction.
In 1945, Gaddis suggests 'citizens of the United States could plausibly claim to live in the freest society on the face of the earth' while 'the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was, at the end of World War II, the most authoritarian society on the face of the earth'.
With a focus as defined as Maxwell's is broad, and a purpose as theoretical as Maxwell's is concrete, Gaddis uses three case studies to examine the effect of surprise on American national security and grand strategy: the British attack on Washington in 1814, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and the terrorist attacks of September 11.
La reflexion que Gaddis propone se abre con la descripcion de uno de los cuadros mas impactantes de la pintura romantica decimononica, El caminante anda en un mar de niebla, de Caspar David Friedrich, donde un hombre que nos da la espalda contempla, desde el pico de una montana, las sombras y las lineas de otros relieves que emergen a trechos, desde un masa agitada de niebla que recuerda una mar picada.
Regarding 11 September, Gaddis writes admiringly of "the most surprising transformation of an underrated national leader since Prince Hal became Henry V" (82).
In his essay on Gaddis, Franzen explains that his troubles start in the later books, in which Gaddis seems stuck and angry, spending hundreds of pages taking the reader to the same emotional place over and over again.