Gadiformes

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Gadiformes

[‚gad·ə′fȯr‚mēz]
(vertebrate zoology)
An order of actinopterygian fishes that lack fin spines and a swim bladder duct and have cycloid scales and many-rayed pelvic fins.

Gadiformes

 

an order of bony fishes (superorder Teleostei). The ventral fins are located in front of the pectorals. In some fish of the family Macrouridae there are two spines in the first dorsal fin. There is usually a barbel on the chin. The body length ranges from several centimeters to 1.5 m or more, and the weight may reach 40 kg. Marine species, that is, all species excluding the burbot, are predominantly benthic and benthopelagic fishes that inhabit cold water to depths of 200–2,000 m or more; a number of species are pelagic. Most members of the order are euryphages and predators. There are about 500 species, belonging to eight families. The USSR has representatives of five families.

Many species of the families Gadidae, Merluccidae, and Macrouridae are important commercially. They yield up to 15 percent of the world fish catch, over 90 percent of which consists of Gadidae.

REFERENCES

Svetovidov, A. N. Treskoobraznye. Moscow-Leningrad, 1948. (Fauna SSSR: Ryby, vol. 9, fasc. 4.)
Zhizn’ zhivotnykh, vol. 4, part 1. Moscow, 1971.