Gadshill

Gadshill

(gădz`hĭl), low hill, Kent, SE England, near Rochester. In Shakespeare's Henry IV it was the scene of Falstaff's robberies. Charles Dickens lived there, at Gadshill Place, from 1856 until his death in 1870.
References in classic literature ?
Dickens lived during the greater part of his life in London, but in his later years near Rochester, at Gadshill, the scene of Falstaff's exploit.
And his description of his fight at Gadshill is punctured by Poins by directing attention comically downwards:
Towards the end of the third act, just after the Gadshill incident, Falstaff remarks to his chief drinking companion:
In general terms, readers of / Henry IV have teased out an analogy between the Gadshill robbery of Act 2 and the rebellion that climaxes with the confrontation at Shrewsbury in acts 4 and 5, but what if the original staging italicized this analogy?
In general terms, readers of 1 Henry IV have teased out an analogy between the Gadshill robbery of Act 2 and the rebellion that climaxes with the confrontation at Shrewsbury in Acts 4 and 5, but what if the original staging italicized this analogy?
Bain, of Gadshill Street, and Barrie, of Denmark Street, both Glasgow, have previous convictions for assault.
Mr Charles Dickens was on Wednesday, struck with paralysis, remained unconscious afterwards, and expired last night at quarter to six o'clock at his residence, Gadshill, near Rochester, Kent.
Having touched a comic nerve, Hazlitt again gets personal: "I have more sympathy with one of Shakespeare's pick-purses, Gadshill or Peto, than I can possibly have with any member of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, and would by no means assist to deliver the one into the hands of the other" (5:28, VI:33).
53) Insofar as Falstaff embodies many elements of rogue culture, especially around the Gadshill robbery, the true prince reduces the Ruzantean fiction of the multiplying buckram men back down to its proper number.
Although Falstaff was wanted for questioning about the robbery at Gadshill, the Chief Justice tells him that he is fortunate that his military service at the battle of Shrewsbury has given him an amnesty from those legal proceedings.
Charles Dickens might have been standing in the front yard of his house at Gadshill when the Aboriginal cricketers drove past on the way from Gravesend to West Malling.
The body of William Taylor, 48, of Coll Street in the city's Royston district, was found at a flat in nearby Gadshill Street in the early hours of the morning.