Gaia hypothesis

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Related to Gaia Theory: deep ecology

Gaia hypothesis

an hypothesis developed by the British scientist, James Lovelock, to suggest that the earth is one living system, such that the distinction between organic and inorganic matter is false. Gaia was an ancient Greek goddess of the earth and fertility Contrary to established scientific notions, Lovelock argues that a conducive physical environment did not first exist within which living organisms could develop, but rather the living organisms create the necessary physical environment for their survival. This leads to the concept of the planet earth as a CYBERNETIC system. In the late 1980s, the Gaia movement emerged as one of the environmental groups increasingly influential in national and international politics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lotka was not only one of Vernadskij's contemporary born in the current Ukraine where Vernadskij set up his laboratory in Kiev, but also the foremost source for the Gaia theory, as Lovelock acknowledged.
Newly published work done at the University of Maryland by first author Harry Oduro, together with UMD geochemist James Farquhar and marine biologist Kathryn Van Alstyne of Western Washington University, provides a tool for tracing and measuring the movement of sulphur through ocean organisms, the atmosphere and the land in ways that may help prove or disprove the controversial Gaia theory.
Newly published work done at the University of Maryland by first author Harry Oduro, together with UMD geochemist James Farquhar and marine biologist Kathryn Van Alstyne of Western Washington University, provides a tool for tracing and measuring the movement of sulfur through ocean organisms, the atmosphere and the land in ways that may help prove or disprove the controversial Gaia theory.
Davies is a zoologist and children's writer, and James Lovelock, a scientist and the creator of Gaia theory, presents a stark afterword in the book's third and final section.
Gaia theory puts an end to the anthropocentrism of the modern world and clears the way for a democratic integration of the human race into the life of the earth system as a whole.
He said he had been influenced by James Lovelock, the inventor of Gaia Theory, which suggests that the world may already have crossed a "tipping point".
I subscribe to James Lovelock's Gaia theory which views the world as a self-sustaining organic system.
GAIA theory, scientific insights and a focus on a living earth make for wonderful, revealing reading in his new book.
He's a critic of the current notions of development and his position springs from an extensive knowledge of the science of climate change and an unimpeachable reverence for the interconnectedness of life on the planet, as articulated in his Gaia theory, combined with an alarm at the complacency around the seriousness of global warming.
If you don't know, suffice it to say that the Gaia Theory would seem to apply, which makes for a rather flat denouement.
Rory Spowers meets James Lovelock, the man behind the Gaia Theory