Gaitskell


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Gaitskell

Hugh (Todd Naylor). 1906--63, British politician; leader of the Labour Party (1955--63)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Gaitskell was met at the colliery entrance by officials of the mineworkers' lodge who asked him if he intends to inspect a "dressed up" section of the mine which he was supposed to visit.
We gave dark matter every opportunity to show up in our experiment, but it chose not to," Gaitskell told (http://www.
The King, who had been due to officiate, was unwell, so Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of the Exchequer, presided instead.
It does not appear possible to reconcile [CDMS-II and LUX]," Gaitskell says.
If that were the correct mass, Gaitskell said, LUX should have detected more than 1,500 WIMPs because it is 20 times as sensitive to such low-mass particles as any previous experiment.
Gaitskell and McKinsey said the experiment has far less radiation interference from cosmic rays than any other dark-matter lab.
Like in the first volume, editor Gaitskell (a practicing Queen's Counsel in Keating Chambers, London, UK, specializing in engineering disputes) presents a step-by-step guide to the processes of the main types of dispute procedure encountered by professionals in the UK construction industry: litigation, arbitration, adjudication, mediation, expert determination, and early neutral evaluation.
The conflict between Hugh Gaitskell and Aneurin Bevan defined Labour politics until the 1990s.
Perhaps you should feel sorry for Robots in Disguise's guitarist and co-vocalist Dee Plume, aka Delia Gaitskell.
Several variants of a portrait conceived in 1963 of Hugh Gaitskell as a Famous Monster of Filmland, conflating a photographic image of the politician with stills from monster movies, eloquently articulate the rage experienced by Hamilton and others at Gaitskell's refusal to accept the argument for nuclear disarmament.
As Campbell notes, the party consists of an alliance between middle-class academic socialists and the working-class trade unions, supplying brains and votes respectively, and the two strands were represented in the Atlee administration by Hugh Gaitskell, the chancellor, and Aneurin Bevan, the minister of health, whom Atlee, back in 1945, had charged with setting up the new National Health Service.
To his chagrin, the tabular paintings were received less as immanent exposes of visual languages than as caricatural comments on consumer society at large, and so, when a political subject did press on Hamilton, he decided to represent it as satirically as possible; the result was Portrait of Hugh Gaitskell as a Famous Monster of Filmland, 1964.