Gaitskell


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Gaitskell

Hugh (Todd Naylor). 1906--63, British politician; leader of the Labour Party (1955--63)
References in periodicals archive ?
All, including opposition leader Hugh Gaitskell, agreed that public opinion would support strong action.
Ministerial meetings were attended by such delegates as the British politician Hugh Gaitskell, the future UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold and the French Foreign Minister Robert Schumann.
Shaped politically and intellectually by the thinking of reforming Labour leader Hugh Gaitskell, Donoughue joined forces with Harold Wilson in 1973 and when Wilson entered 10 Downing Street the following year, Donoughue went with him as senior policy advisor.
Hugh Gaitskell has been compelled to disclose the amount of the dollar gap and, to use the language of the diplomats, "it is understood from reliable sources" that his recent visit to Washington on a help seeking mission was by no means successful.
It was a house visited by admirals, ambassadors, scientists, academics and politicians including Hugh Gaitskell, Roy Jenkins, Nye Bevan and Jennie Lee.
Hitch-hiking together from Glasgow to Guildford to hear Hugh Gaitskell.
For example, only six pages are devoted to Attlee's years as opposition leader from 1951-55, a time when the party was rent asunder because of feuding between Nye Bevan and Hugh Gaitskell.
When Gaitskell arrived in Ottawa, Abbott described the excruciating political problems of the Canadian federal system and then asked, "What would you do if you had my problems?
Those with memories of 1959 will remember how confident of winning Hugh Gaitskell was.
Implicit here, then, is a shift not only in media hegemony from the "screened" image, as in the print culture essayed in Hugh Gaitskell, to the "scanned" image, as in the televisual spectacle captured in Kent State, but also in the positioning of the viewer, who, in the latter regime, is both entirely external to such events and traumatically intimate with them ("extimate," a Lacanian might say).
He accepted a peerage from Margaret Thatcher's government in 1981, having turned down one from Labour's Hugh Gaitskell 38 years previously.
He is now a single parent of two boys, living on the notorious Gaitskell estate in Leicestershire.