Galápagos Land Iguana

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Galápagos Land Iguana

 

(Conolophus subcristatus), also brown and gold land iguana, a lizard of the family Iguanidae. Measuring up to 1 m long, it has a short crest of enlarged scales along the spine. It is found only on the Galápagos Islands. The lizard digs deep burrows and feeds on vegetation, primarily cacti. During his voyage on the Beagle, C. Darwin observed large number of Galapagos land iguanas on James Island. Today their numbers have sharply decreased, and there are small numbers of them only on some of the islands.

References in periodicals archive ?
Physical and biotic determinants of space utilization by the Galapagos Land Iguana (Conolophus pallidus).
Diet, digestion, and food preferences of Galapagos land iguanas.
The reptiles appear to be Galapagos Land Iguanas (conolophus subcristatus), an endangered species.
Galapagos land iguanas belong to the genus Conolophus, of which there are currently three recognised species.
Variation among populations of Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus): contrasts of phylogeny and ecology.
Snell of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque says he finds growth anomalies in Galapagos land iguanas but remains cautious about shrinkage.
Behavioral and morphological adaptations of Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus subcristatus) to water and energy requirements of eggs and neonates.
Galapagos land iguanas diverged from the famous Galapagos marine iguanas 10 to 20 million years ago, and there are currently two recognized species of terrestrial iguanas: Conolophus subcristatus and C.