Galatia

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Galatia

(gəlā`shə) [Gr.,=Gaul], ancient territory of central Asia Minor, in present Turkey (around modern Ankara). It was so called from its inhabitants, the Gauls, who invaded from the west and conquered it in the 3d cent. B.C. The name applies to the Gallic territory that was originally composed of parts of Phrygia and Cappadocia. Attalus I checked (230 B.C.) the advance of the Gauls and reduced the size of Galatia. The region was subjected (189 B.C.) by the Romans. The name was also used for the Roman province, formed in 25 B.C. At first the Roman province was much larger than old Galatia, but it was reduced (A.D. 72) to a smaller scope.

Galatia

an ancient region in central Asia Minor, conquered by Gauls 278--277 bc: later a Roman province
References in periodicals archive ?
Between these two alternatives, the Galatians are hesitating.
They may struggle a bit with the details of the author's exegesis of Galatians 2.
In Schussler Fiorenza's view, Galatians 3:28 is the "magna carta of Christian Feminism.
And just as Paul wondered what had happened in the Galatian church, we can ask the same question today about our Catholic church: Have we become stupefied by the law of these fathers M a way that is actually undermining the integrity of local churches in order to preserve laws around a priesthood that is only male and celibate (at least in the Latin Rite)?
Isaiah 65:1-9; Psalm 22:19-28; Galatians 3:23-29; Luke 8:26-39
Not everyone, of course, in the Galatian assemblies would be circumcised; some were women.
Without knowing the particular situation of the Galatian congregation, many of Paul's exhortations feel somewhat slippery.
If some chose to read into it what they wanted they either have never read Galatians Chapter 6 or have misread it.
In Galatians 6, the apostle Paul describes the life or death that each of us will reap.
wades into the controverted waters of what Paul means by stoicheia, the "elemental spirits," in Galatians (4:3,9).
Synopsis: In "Galatians" (the newest volume in the outstanding Baker Academics 'Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament series), respected New Testament scholar Peter Oakes (Greenwood Senior Lecturer in the New Testament at the University of Manchester) offers a translation and reading of Galatians as presenting a gospel of unity in diversity in Christ.