Galicians


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Galicians

 

Gallegos, a people making up most of the population of Galicia. There are approximately 2.6 million Galicians in Spain (1970, estimate). They speak Galician, or Gallego, a language related to Portuguese. Their religion is Roman Catholicism. The ancestors of the Galicians—celticized Gallaici tribes—were strongly influenced by the Romans (first century A.D.) and the Suevi (fifth and sixth centuries). The chief occupations of the Galicians are farming, cattle raising, and on the Atlantic coast, fishing. A shortage of land and national oppression have resulted in systematic emigration since the 18th century (more than half a million Galicians now reside in the countries of the Americas).

REFERENCE

Narody Zarubezhnoi Evropy, vol. 2. Moscow, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
This implies that, in the case of the Iberian Peninsula, the conflicts and confrontations existing, for example, in a given social space defined as Catalan or Galician belong to the repertoire level where the use of one language or another would be a component of each repertoire in conflict.
The desire for autonomy that guides the involvement of many actors in Galician society manifests itself primarily as an awareness of repression, while at the same time it is associated with a lack of the socio-economic means to struggle for Galicia's autonomy.
In his analysis of diaspora as a special condition that results from emigration, Fernando Perez-Barreiro Nolla argues that the Galician diaspora should be included in the overall concept of Galician identity "como factor da naturaleza e o futuro do pais galego.
23) may have also responded to their wish to escape domineering wives and avoid the embarrassing reputation that, according to a Galician proverb, "a married man is a woman" (p.
As mentioned earlier, participants belonged to two well distinguished generational groups: first generation immigrants (45 to 60 years old) who arrived in London from Galicia (a mainly fishing and agricultural region in Northwestern Spain) in the 1970s, their mother tongue being Galician and Spanish, their English, in most cases, being quite poor.
As an example, I refer to the Asociacion Internacional de Estudos Galegos which has already organized eight triennial congresses aimed at encouraging research into Galician culture around the world.
The region, perched on Spain's northwest corner, has gained enviable momentum following its path-breaking 1999 Audiovisual Law that ushered in the Galician Audiovisual Consortium and the 52-company Galician Audiovisual Cluster in 2003, and now a new venture-capital firm, SempreCinema.
And yet urban Galicians have not convincingly remade the mold either.
The "modern" Irish of whom he speaks exist with the Galicians in a common Celtic territory, beyond time.
Galician actor Luis Tosar ("Miami Vice") sits on a granite staircase gazing at his spectator shoes.
Pushed by CRTVG director general Francisco Campos and TVG director Anxo Quintanilla since 1995, Galician pubcaster TVG drips drama.