Galilean

(redirected from Galileans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Galilean

a. the. an epithet of Jesus Christ (?4 bc--?29 ad), the founder of Christianity
b. a Christian
References in periodicals archive ?
apocryphal story had Julian, on his deathbed, speaking to Jesus: "You have won, Galilean.
In 1870 Henrik Ibsen wrote an enormously ambitious play, Emperor and Galilean, which begins with Julian's youth and his attraction to the gods.
Just as the Galileans had something of value to offer at the time of Jesus, what we offer society is not just for ourselves, but for the good of humanity.
Could the reason be that Galileans were not welcome in Jerusalem at night because they were regarded as troublemakers, or simply because of who they were?
Instead of addressing the archaeological evidence, Horsley chooses to engage in a reconstruction of Galilean history until Hasmonean times based on very complex biblical data.
Here I do state my preference for rationalist Galilean solutions over pure Franciscan lyricism.
And En Gedi is also the great Galilean symbol of moral restraint upon murder, for here David could have ambushed a defenceless Saul, yet desisted (I Samuel, 23-24).
Thus, while other Galileans, both immediately before and after his time, engaged in violent reaction to the exploitation they were encountering, Jesus chose to challenge the status quo in a more subtle but in the end more effective and long-lasting manner, namely, through the power of symbolic actions and choices.
I suggest that these aspects take on richer and deeper significance when they are interpreted in the context of the everyday experiences of Galilean life and landscape in the Herodian period.
60) Sean Freyne, "Urban-Rural Relations in First-Century Galilee: Some Suggestions from the Literary Sources," in Galilee in Late Antiquity 75-91; and Freyne, "Behind the Names: Galileans, Samaritans, loudaioi," in Galilee through the Centuries: Confluence of Cultures, ed.
The Galileans who perished, those in Jerusalem who suffered, and even ol' Harry are no different from any of us.
He asks us to fasten onto the Galilean identity of Jesus, which reflects an ethos of a people who rebelled against imperial power's false claims over life and death.