galley

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galley,

long, narrow vessel widely used in ancient and medieval times, propelled principally by oars but also fitted with sails. The earliest type was sometimes 150 ft (46 m) long with 50 oars. Rowers were slaves, prisoners of war, or (later) convicts; they were usually chained to benches set along the sides, the center of the vessel being used for cargo. Galleys were decked at the bow and stern but were otherwise open. The typical galley was the trireme, with three banks of oars; smaller and more manageable galleys (biremes) had two banks. These vessels became very large, some reputedly having as many as 40 banks of oars, but smaller vessels were again common by the 1st cent. B.C. When galleys were employed in war, the sides were so designed that they could be raised to afford protection for the rowers. The Romans used hooks to fasten onto enemy vessels and carried bridges for boarding. Galleys were used in the Mediterranean by the French and Venetians until the 17th cent. In modern usage the galley is the kitchen of a ship.

Galley

 

a wooden rowing warship created by the Venetians in the seventh century. It was 40-50 m long and about 6 m wide, with a draft of about 2 m and one row of 16 to 25 pairs of oars. Each oar was operated by five or six slave oarsmen who wore leg chains; the whole crew together with the soldiers was about 450 men. The speed of the galley was up to 7 knots (13 km/hr) in calm weather. It had two masts with sails fore and aft. From the 14th century on, its artillery consisted of five guns. The bow was equipped with an above-water ram. The fleets of all countries had galleys. In Russia, Peter I in the late 17th century created a galley fleet, which developed parallel to the sailing ships until the late 18th century. On the Russian galleys the oarsmen were soldiers.

galley

[′gal·ē]
(engineering)
The kitchen of a ship, airplane, or trailer.
(graphic arts)
A flat, oblong, open-ended tray into which the letters assembled by hand in a composing stick are transferred after the composing stick is full.

galley

The onboard meal service preparation area.

galley

1. any of various kinds of ship propelled by oars or sails used in ancient or medieval times as a warship or as a trader
2. the kitchen of a ship, boat, or aircraft
3. any of various long rowing boats
References in periodicals archive ?
Though these have been known since Charles Hoffmann's 1969 PMLA essay, "Virginia Woolf's Manuscript Revisions of The Years," and Grace Radin's first transcription of the galley proofs in her 1977 article, "'Two enormous chunks': Episodes Excluded during the Final Revisions of The Years," in the Bulletin of the New York Public Library, Snaith's edition would not be complete without reprinting them.
He confirms that the job of printing galley proofs at Fraser & Jenkinson did not progress to the metal type being locked into sixteen-page formes, in readiness for printing an edition of the novel.
Ironically, it appears that the sketches from the galley proofs (as well as those from the manuscripts) that many Galdos scholars have longed to see give rise to more confusion than clarity, and researchers who venture into this dimension of the novelist's creativity are confronted with problematic identifications and a series of difficult-to-answer questions.
Carefully review the galley proofs from the print shop before the final copies are printed.
In the first galley proofs of 1894L the sheets of 'The Son's Veto' bear the printer's date stamp 1 and 4 December 1893.
But some literary manuscripts are hidden away among the listings for letters; for example, a leaf of Past and Present and some galley proofs of The History of Frederich 11 of Prussia appear among the listings for Thomas Carlyle's letters in the National Library of Scotland (176b), and some proofs of Carlyle's Letters of Oliver Cromwell appear in a listing of "12 letters from Edward Fitzgerald to [Thomas] Carlyle about the Battle of Naseby," at the University of Cambridge (177C).
Lerner spent half a year at Cambridge, coming to understand the General Theory while listening to Keynes lecturing from its galley proofs.
The final chapter applies the insights provided in the preceding chapters to some special applications: the preparation of indexes for biographies, magazines, and newspapers and from the galley proofs of books in press.
Ulysses was, at Joyce's insistence, published on 2 February 1922, his own fortieth birthday, but in the ten days between Pound's announcement and the arrival of the annotated galley proofs of part of 'Circe' at the office of Sylvia Beach on 9 November 1921, he added to his annotations a final reply to Pound's incursion.
Both had been correct in the galley proofs (risks-request@csl.
The article that follows is based upon early galley proofs of the book.