Gallons per flush


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Gallons per flush

Measurement of water use in toilets. Since 1992, toilets sold in the United States have been restricted to 1.6 gallons per flush or less. The standard for high-efficiency toilets is 1.28 gallons per flush.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gallons per flush should be printed in the tank or on the packing box.
6 gallons per flush or less, plus owners will have to install showerheads and faucets that cap the water flow at 2.
There are now one- to one-and-a-half gallons per flush toilets on the market, and they can cut your indoor water use by about 25%.
Low-flow water closets with sensor-operated electronic dual-flush valves that automatically adjust the gallons per flush to match the apparent need
0 gallons per flush (gpf), some legacy models that use 3-5 gallons might remain in use, notes the EPA.
6 gallons per flush in new units, producing a 25 percent water-use reduction for the average family.
Older toilets use 5 gallons per flush, but those made within the past 10 years use 3.
On California's Monterey Peninsula, it's now a misdemeanor to install a "water-hog" toilet one using more than 1 1/2 gallons per flush in new construction.
1 gallons per flush (gpf) flushometer toilet systems- the industry's first at this low output- deliver 31 percent water savings compared to a standard 1.
There's more to low-flow retrofits than spotting the right gallons per flush or gallons per minute rating.