Gallup poll

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Gallup Poll

a sampling by the American Institute of Public Opinion or its British counterpart of the views of a representative cross section of the population, used esp as a means of forecasting voting

Gallup poll

See GALLUP.

Gallup Poll

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A 1980 Gallup Poll revealed that 71 percent of Americans believe in an afterlife. A 2001 Gallup Poll showed that 38 percent believe it is possible to make contact with the dead; 54 percent believe in the effectiveness of spiritual healing; 42 percent believe in ghosts and hauntings.

References in periodicals archive ?
Learn more about how Gallup Poll Social Series works.
Gallup said that in recent years it has increasingly focused its polling and reporting on its unprecedented Daily tracking program, its monthly Gallup Poll Social Series, and its World Poll.
For the upcoming Gallup Polls, the online bookmaker has created an over/under approval rating of 35.
First Gallup Poll Conducted In November 2005 Over 41.
5 million people interviewed by The Gallup Poll since 1935.
Subscribers to the Gallup Brain receive access through Gallup's new premium news publication--The Gallup Poll Tuesday Briefing.
Before this year, the largest-ever GOP lead in Gallup polls was five points.
According to recent Gallup Poll data, about 25% of Americans say they will spend less on Christmas gifts this year than they did last year.
The Gallup poll released Friday also marks a massive shift from one year ago, when 50 percent of Americans called themselves pro-choice, and just 44 percent said they were pro-life.
executive said the company was "extremely pleased" to learn that a new Gallup poll, released today and funded by the American Lung Association, confirms that the majority of Americans believe smoking should continue to be permitted in public places.
The 2007 results are based on the five most recent Gallup Polls, spanning October, November, and early December.
7-10 Gallup Poll, allowed respondents to name any candidate or political party, without prompting of specific names from Gallup interviewers.