Diaspora

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Diaspora

(dīăs`pərə) [Gr.,=dispersion], term used today to denote the Jewish communities living outside the Holy Land. It was originally used to designate the dispersal of the Jews at the time of the destruction of the first Temple (586 B.C.) and the forced exile [Heb.,=Galut] to Babylonia (see Babylonian captivityBabylonian captivity,
in the history of Israel, the period from the fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.) to the reconstruction in Palestine of a new Jewish state (after 538 B.C.).
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). The diaspora became a permanent feature of Jewish life; by A.D. 70 Jewish communities existed in Babylonia, Syria, Egypt, Cyrene, Asia Minor, Greece, and Rome. Jews followed the Romans into Europe and from Persia and Babylonia spread as far east as China. In modern times, Jews have migrated to the Americas, South Africa, and Australia. The Jewish population of Central and Eastern Europe, until World War II the largest in the world, was decimated in the HolocaustHolocaust
, name given to the period of persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany. Romani (Gypsies), homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, the disabled, and others were also victims of the Holocaust.
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. Despite the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, the vast majority of the Jewish people remains in the diaspora, notably in North America, Russia, and Ukraine. The term diaspora has also been applied to other peoples with large numbers living outside their traditional homelands. See JewsJews
[from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half-brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to Judaism.
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; JudaismJudaism
, the religious beliefs and practices and the way of life of the Jews. The term itself was first used by Hellenized Jews to describe their religious practice, but it is of predominantly modern usage; it is not used in the Bible or in Rabbinic literature and only rarely
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.

diaspora

(from the Greek dia, through, and speiro, scatter) the situation of any group of people dispersed, whether forcibly or voluntarily, throughout the world. Referring particularly to the Jewish experience, the term may be applied to any comparable migrant groups. In a world ever more subject to GLOBALIZATION, diasporic communities are increasingly a feature of the world and the social and political implications of these are much studied. See also POST-COLONIAL THEORY.

Diaspora

 

the residence of a significant portion of a people (ethnic group) outside their native land. Diasporas have occurred as a result of forced deportation, the threat of genocide, and economic and geographic factors. Originally the term “diaspora” denoted the existence of Jews outside Palestine, especially after their exile by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II at the beginning of the sixth century B.C. and by the Romans in the first and second centuries A.D. Subsequently, the term was applied to other ethnic and religious groups, such as the Armenians, Irish, Chinese, and early Christians.

Diaspora

1. 
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
3. a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
References in periodicals archive ?
El espacio geografico de la galut como "exilio, deportacion, opresion"
Zionism gives the Jews the power to roll back the rock of the galut and "rise" to a new life in its new land, through which salvation is brought to the world.
Zionism postulated an identity essential to the Jewish self that had been suppressed by Galut dormancy, and Broner's agonistic relation to patriarchy may be perceived to do much the same with feminine identity.
The establishment of the Israeli state may be "the most profound modification of the Galut which has occurred .
Living for many years in the Galut (diaspora), squealers could become very dangerous for the well-being and survival of a persecuted minority.
Theological, literary and folkloric references to Zion as the site of return and of the reversal of all conditions of Galut [exile] have a considerable history (see Eisen).
1943-44; "Special Masterpieces"), Galut ve-ge`ulah (1952; "Diaspora and Return"), and Moreh ha-dorot (1963; "Teacher of the Generations").
The Hebrew term galut (also golus, galuth ) expresses the Jew 's feeling of living as a member of a relatively defenseless minority, subject to injustice if not to outright persecution, of an unfulfilled life and destiny as a Jew, and of living in an unredeemed -- though not unredeemable -- world.
Later in the novel, the motif of loss and the impossibility of reconciling the two worlds is reinforced by the figure of Jacob's expulsion from the yeshiva after the subtle homoeroticism of learning translates into Jacob's actual, conventional, easily signified, and categorized "sex" with Ari, (59) which may allude to the biblical image of the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden and to the image of exile, galut, the loss of home.
Last winter, I was a lonely Jew living in galut (Yiddish for "exile" or "diaspora") outside Dallas, Texas, where I felt alienated from any and all aspects of Jewish life or culture, disconnected from my community and my heritage.
Durante el interminable Galut, lo que en el mundo cristiano se conoce como diaspora, el pueblo judio ha necesitado ser acogido a lo largo de los siglos por los habitantes de tierras extranas.
The exodus from Egypt provided them with a paradigm of redemption from slavery, persecution, and "the tragedy of the galut [exile].