Gamburtsev Mountains

Gamburtsev Mountains

 

subglacial mountains in the central part of eastern Antarctica. They extend for 1,200-1,300 km in the shape of an arc, stretching south, between 72° and 82° S lat. and 30° and 90° E long. They are 200-500 km wide. The highest known peaks are 2,990 m and 3,390 m. The ice above them is at least 600 m thick. The mountains were discovered by a Soviet Antarctic expedition in 1958 and named for G. A. Gamburtsev.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Gamburtsev mountains - as big as the Alps - were discovered in 1958 and have baffled experts since.
Buried deep beneath East Antarctica's ice sheet, the Gamburtsev Mountains are the world's most invisible range.
Researchers-studying the invisible Gamburtsev Mountains buried under as much as two miles of ice- have discovered that liquid water locked deep under the continent's coat of ice regularly thaws and refreezes to the bottom, creating as much as half the thickness of the ice in places, and actively modifying its structure.
Buried far beneath that region's relatively flat surface, however, lies a chain of peaks called the Gamburtsev Mountains.
According to a report in National Geographic Society, ground-penetrating radar results from 2008 and 2009 have made possible the most detailed images yet of the Gamburtsev Mountains and researchers say it's a surprisingly serrated range.