Gamburtsev Mountains

Gamburtsev Mountains

 

subglacial mountains in the central part of eastern Antarctica. They extend for 1,200-1,300 km in the shape of an arc, stretching south, between 72° and 82° S lat. and 30° and 90° E long. They are 200-500 km wide. The highest known peaks are 2,990 m and 3,390 m. The ice above them is at least 600 m thick. The mountains were discovered by a Soviet Antarctic expedition in 1958 and named for G. A. Gamburtsev.

References in periodicals archive ?
Far beneath its frozen surface lie the Gamburtsev mountains, where glaciologists believe the Antarctic ice sheet was born.
According to a report in National Geographic Society, ground-penetrating radar results from 2008 and 2009 have made possible the most detailed images yet of the Gamburtsev Mountains and researchers say it's a surprisingly serrated range.
Buried far beneath that region's relatively flat surface, however, lies a chain of peaks called the Gamburtsev Mountains.
The Gamburtsev mountains - as big as the Alps - were discovered in 1958 and have baffled experts since.
Buried deep beneath East Antarctica's ice sheet, the Gamburtsev Mountains are the world's most invisible range.